HP StorageWorks
2000 Family Modular Smart Array
troubleshooting guide
Part number: 481601-001
First edition: March, 2008
Legal and notice information
© Copyright 2008 Hewlett-Packard Development Company, L.P.
Hewlett-Packard Company makes no warranty of any kind with regard to this material, including, but not limited to, the implied
warranties of merchantability and fitness for a particular purpose. Hewlett-Packard shall not be liable for errors contained herein or for
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without warranty of any kind and is subject to change without notice. The only warranties for HP products and services are set forth in the
express warranty statements accompanying such products and services. Nothing herein should be construed as constituting an
additional warranty. HP shall not be liable for technical or editorial errors or omissions contained herein.
Microsoft and Windows are U.S. registered trademarks of Microsoft Corporation.
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Contents
About This Guide . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9
Intended Audience . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9
Prerequisites . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9
Document Conventions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10
HP Technical Support . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10
Customer Self Repair . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10
Product Warranties . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11
Subscription Service . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11
HP Websites . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11
Documentation Feedback . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11
1. System Components . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13
Architecture Overview . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13
Enclosure Chassis and Midplane . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14
Midplane . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14
Enclosure ID Display . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15
Drive Modules . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 16
Disk Drives . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 16
Controller Modules . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17
Drive Expansion Module . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17
Power-and-Cooling Modules . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 18
Power Supply Unit . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 18
Cooling Fans . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 18
Airflow . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 19
4HP StorageWorks 2000 Family Modular Smart Array troubleshooting guideMarch 2008
2. Fault Isolation Methodology . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 21
Gather Fault Information . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 21
Determine Where the Fault Is Occurring . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 21
Review the Event Logs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 22
Isolate the Fault . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 22
3. Troubleshooting Using System LEDs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 23
LED Names and Locations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 23
Using LEDs to Check System Status . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 25
Using Enclosure Status LEDs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 26
Using Drive Module LEDs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 26
Using Controller Module Host Port LEDs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 27
Using the Controller Module Expansion Port LED . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 30
Using Ethernet Management Port LEDs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 31
Using Controller Module Status LEDs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 32
Using Power-and-Cooling Module LEDs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 33
Using Expansion Module LEDs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 33
4. Troubleshooting Using SMU . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 35
Correcting Enclosure IDs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 35
Determining Storage System Status and Verifying Faults . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 36
Stopping I/O . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 37
Isolating Faulty Disk Drives . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 38
Identifying a Faulty Disk Drive . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 38
Reviewing Disk Drive Error Statistics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 39
Reviewing the Event Logs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 41
Reconstructing a Virtual Disk . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 42
Isolating Data Path Faults . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 43
Isolating Internal Data Path Faults . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 43
Contents 5
Isolating External Data Path Faults on a Fibre Channel Storage System . . . . . . 48
Isolating External Data Path Faults on an iSCSI Storage System . . . . . . . . . . . 49
Resetting a Host Channel on a Fibre Channel Storage System . . . . . . . . . . . . . 50
Isolating Disk Drive Faults . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 50
Clearing Metadata From Leftover Disk Drives . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 51
Using Diagnostic Functions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 52
Trusting a Virtual Disk for Disaster Recovery . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 52
Viewing the Debug Log . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 53
Viewing Crash and Boot Data . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 53
Viewing a CAPI Command Trace . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 55
Viewing a Management Trace . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 56
Selecting Individual Events for Notification . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 57
Selecting or Clearing All Events for Notification . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 58
Enabling Service Interfaces . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 59
Restoring Management Controller Defaults Only . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 60
Changing Fault Isolation and PHY Settings . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 61
Using Recovery and Debug Utilities . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 62
Dequarantining a Virtual Disk . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 62
Saving Log Information to a File . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 63
Problems Using SMU to Access a Storage System . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 65
Problems Scheduling Tasks . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 66
Create the Task . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 66
Schedule the Task . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 66
Resetting the Clock . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 67
Deleting Tasks . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 67
Errors Associated with Scheduling Tasks . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 68
6HP StorageWorks 2000 Family Modular Smart Array troubleshooting guideMarch 2008
5. Troubleshooting Using Event Logs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 69
Event Severities . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 69
Viewing the Event Log in SMU . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 70
Viewing an Event Log Saved From SMU . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 71
Reviewing Event Logs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 72
Configuring the Debug Log . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 73
Viewing the Debug Log . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 74
6. Voltage and Temperature Warnings . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 75
Resolving Voltage and Temperature Warnings . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 75
Sensor Locations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 76
Power Supply Sensors . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 76
Cooling Fan Sensors . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 77
Temperature Sensors . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 78
Power-and-Cooling Module Voltage Sensors . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 79
7. Troubleshooting and Replacing FRUs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 81
Available FRUs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 82
Static Electricity Precautions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 84
Identifying Controller or Expansion Module Faults . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 84
Removing and Replacing a Controller or Expansion Module . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 86
Saving Configuration Settings . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 86
Shutting Down a Controller Module . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 88
Removing a Controller Module or Expansion Module . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 89
Installing a Controller Module or Expansion Module . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 91
Moving a Set of Expansion Modules . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 93
Updating Firmware . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 93
Updating Firmware During Controller Replacement . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 93
Updating Firmware Using SMU . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 94
Contents 7
Identifying SFP Module Faults on A Fibre Channel Storage System . . . . . . . . . . . . 95
Removing and Replacing an SFP Module on a Fibre Channel Storage System . . . . 96
Removing an SFP Module . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 96
Installing an SFP Module . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 96
Identifying Cable Faults . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 97
Identifying Cable Faults on the Host Side . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 97
Identifying Cable Faults on the Drive Enclosure Side . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 97
Disconnecting and Reconnecting SAS Cables . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 97
Identifying Drive Module Faults . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 98
Understanding Disk-Related Errors . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 99
Disk Drive Errors . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 100
Disk Channel Errors . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 101
Identifying Faulty Drive Modules . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 102
Updating Disk Drive Firmware . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 103
Removing and Replacing a Drive Module . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 104
Replacing a Drive Module When the Virtual Disk Is Rebuilding . . . . . . . . . . 105
Identifying the Location of a Faulty Drive Module . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 106
Removing a Drive Module . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 107
Installing a Drive Module . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 108
Verify That the Correct Power-On Sequence Was Performed . . . . . . . . . . . . . 111
Installing an Air Management Module . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 111
Identifying Virtual Disk Faults . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 112
Clearing Metadata From a Disk Drive . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 113
Identifying Power-and-Cooling Module Faults . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 114
Removing and Replacing a Power-and-Cooling Module . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 115
Removing a Power-and-Cooling Module . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 115
Installing a Power-and-Cooling Module . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 117
Replacing an Enclosure . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 117
8HP StorageWorks 2000 Family Modular Smart Array troubleshooting guideMarch 2008
A. Troubleshooting Using the CLI . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 119
Viewing Command Help . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 120
clear cache . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 120
clear expander-status . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 120
ping . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 121
rescan . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 121
reset host-channel-link . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 121
restart . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 121
restore defaults . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 122
set debug-log-parameters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 122
set expander-fault-isolation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 123
set expander-phy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 123
set led . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 123
set protocols . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 123
show debug-log . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 124
show debug-log-parameters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 124
show enclosure-status . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 124
show events . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 125
show expander-status . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 125
show frus . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 125
show protocols . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 125
show redundancy-mode . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 126
trust . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 126
Index . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 127
9
About This Guide
Intended Audience
This guide is intended for use by system administrators and information
professionals who are experienced with the following:
Direct attach storage (DAS) or storage area network (SAN) management
Network administration
Storage system configuration
Prerequisites
Prerequisites for installing and configuring this product include familiarity with:
Servers and computer networks
Fibre Channel, iSCSI, and Ethernet protocols
10 HP StorageWorks 2000 Family Modular Smart Array troubleshooting guideMarch 2008
Document Conventions
HP Technical Support
Telephone numbers for worldwide technical support are listed on the HP support
website: http://www.hp.com/support/.
Collect the following information before calling:
Technical support registration number (if applicable)
Product serial numbers
Product model names and numbers
Applicable error messages
Operating system type and revision level
Detailed, specific questions
For continuous quality improvement, calls may be recorded or monitored.
Customer Self Repair
HP customer self repair (CSR) programs allow you to repair your HP StorageWorks
product. If a CSR part needs replacing, HP ships the part directly to you so that you
can install it at your convenience. Some parts do not qualify for CSR. Your HP-
authorized service provider will determine whether a repair can be accomplished by
CSR.
Typeface Meaning Examples
AaBbCc123 Book title, new term, or
emphasized word
See the Release Notes.
A virtual disk (vdisk) can ....
You must be an advanced user to ....
AaBbCc123 Directory or file name,
value, command, or
on-screen output
The default file name is store.logs.
The default IP address is 10.0.0.1.
Typ e exit.
AaBbCc123 Text you type, contrasted
with on-screen output
# set password
Enter new password:
AaBbCc123 Variable text you replace
with an actual value
Use the format http://ip-address.
About This Guide 11
For more information about CSR, contact your local service provider. For North
America, see the CSR website:
http://www.hp.com/go/selfrepair
Product Warranties
For information about HP StorageWorks product warranties, see the warranty
information website:
http://www.hp.com/go/storagewarranty
Subscription Service
HP strongly recommends that customers sign up online using the Subscriber's
choice website: http://www.hp.com/go/e-updates.
Subscribing to this service provides you with e-mail updates on the latest product
enhancements, newest versions of drivers, and firmware documentation updates as
well as instant access to numerous other product resources.
HP Websites
For other product information, see the following HP websites:
http://www.hp.com
http://www.hp.com/go/storage
http://www.hp.com/service_locator
http://www.hp.com/support/manuals
http://www.hp.com/support/downloads
Documentation Feedback
HP welcomes your feedback.
To make comments and suggestions about product documentation, please send a
message to [email protected]. All submissions become the
property of HP.
12 HP StorageWorks 2000 Family Modular Smart Array troubleshooting guideMarch 2008
13
CHAPTER1
System Components
This chapter describes the storage system architecture. Prior to troubleshooting any
system, it is important to understand the architecture, including each of the system
components, how they relate to each other, and how data passes through the system.
Topics covered in this chapter include:
“Architecture Overview” on page 13
“Enclosure Chassis and Midplane” on page 14
“Drive Modules” on page 16
“Controller Modules” on page 17
“Power-and-Cooling Modules” on page 18
Architecture Overview
The following figure shows how field-replaceable units (FRUs) connect within a
storage system enclosure:
Figure 1-1 MSA2000 Family Storage System Architecture Overview
Drive module
Power-and-cooling module
Midplane
I/O module
14 HP StorageWorks 2000 Family Modular Smart Array troubleshooting guideMarch 2008
FRUs include:
Chassis-and-midplane. An enclosure’s 2U metal chassis and its midplane circuit
board comprise a single FRU. All other FRUs connect and interact through the
midplane.
Drive module. An enclosure can contain 12 SATA or SAS drive modules.
I/O module. A controller enclosure can contain one or two controller modules; a
drive enclosure can contain one or two expansion modules. Each type of I/O
module controls I/O between attached hosts and storage system disk drives.
Power-and-cooling modules.
The following sections describe each FRU in more detail.
Note - Do not remove a FRU until the replacement is on-hand. Removing a FRU
without a replacement will disrupt the system airflow and cause an over-temperature
condition.
Enclosure Chassis and Midplane
An enclosure’s metal chassis is 2U in height. The front of the enclosure has two
rackmount flanges, called ears. The left ear has the enclosure ID display. The right
ear has enclosure status LEDs. The chassis also includes the midplane circuit board.
If the chassis or midplane is damaged they are replaced as a unit.
Midplane
The midplane circuit board is the common connection point for all system
electronics; all other FRUs plug into this board. Drive modules plug into the front of
the midplane. Power-and-cooling modules and I/O modules (controller modules or
expansion modules) plug into the back of the midplane. The midplane supports 3.0-
Gbit/sec SATA and 3-Gbit/sec SAS operation.
Chapter 1 System Components 15
Enclosure ID Display
The enclosure ID (EID) display provides a visual single-digit identifier for each
enclosure in a storage system. The EID display is located on the left ear, as viewed
from the front of the chassis.
For a storage system that includes a controller module, EID values are set by the
RAID controller. For drive enclosures that are attached to a host for use as JBODs
(just a bunch of disks), EID values are set by the host.
When drive enclosures are attached to a controller enclosure:
The controller enclosure’s EID is zero.
A drive enclosure’s EID is nonzero. The EID is 1 for the first drive enclosure,
and the EID is incremented for each subsequent enclosure.
EIDs are persistent, so will not change during simple reconfigurations.
EIDs can be used to correlate physical enclosures with logical views of the
storage system provided by system interfaces such as SMU.
When drive enclosures are attached to a host:
A drive enclosure’s EID can be zero or nonzero.
Each drive enclosure in a storage system must have a unique EID.
EIDs are persistent, so will not change during simple reconfigurations.
EIDs can be used to correlate physical enclosures with logical views of the
storage system provided by system interfaces.
When installing a system with drive enclosures attached, the enclosure IDs might
not agree with the physical cabling order. This is because the controller might have
been previously attached to some of the same enclosures and it attempts to preserve
the previous enclosure IDs, if possible. To correct this, make sure that both
controllers are up and perform a rescan using HP StorageWorks MSA2000 Family
Storage Management Utility (SMU) (see “Correcting Enclosure IDs” on page35) or
the command-line interface (CLI) (see “rescan” on page 121). This will reorder the
enclosures, but can take up to two minutes for the IDs to be corrected.
EIDs are managed by SES functions of the Expander Controller in each controller
module and expansion module.
For information about how EIDs are affected when expansion modules are moved,
see “Moving a Set of Expansion Modules” on page 93.
16 HP StorageWorks 2000 Family Modular Smart Array troubleshooting guideMarch 2008
Drive Modules
The drive module has a front bezel with a latch that is used to insert or remove the
drive module. When any component of a drive module fails, the entire module is
replaced. Each drive module is inserted into a drive slot (or bay) in an enclosure.
The following figure shows the numbering of drive slots in an enclosure.
Figure 1-2 Drive Slot Numbers
A drive is identified by the numbers of the enclosure and slot that the drive is in.
For example, the last drive in the controller enclosure is identified as 0.11 (EID 0,
slot 11). Drive modules are slot-independent, that is, the drives can be moved to any
slot with the power off. Once power is applied, the RAID controllers use the
metadata held on each disk to locate each member of a virtual disk.
Disk Drives
Each RAID controller has single-port access from the local SAS expander to
internal and drive enclosure drives. Alternate path, dual-port access to all internal
drives is accomplished through the expander inter-controller wide lane connection.
Dual-port access assumes the presence of both controller modules. In a failed over
configuration, where the partner controller module is down or removed, only single-
port access to the drives exists.
The storage system can include either or both SAS or SATA II drives. A drive can
be interchanged with a qualified equivalent drive. In addition, each enclosure can be
populated with disks of various capacities. To ensure the full use of a disk’s
capacity, construct all virtual disks with disks of the same capacity.
0
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
Chapter 1 System Components 17
Controller Modules
A controller module is a FRU that contains two connected circuit boards: a RAID
I/O module and a host interface module (HIM).
The RAID I/O module is a hot-pluggable board that mates with the enclosure
midplane and provides all RAID controller functions and SAS/SATA disk channels.
The midplane connector interface supports high-speed serial lanes operating at up to
4-Gbit/sec link speed.
The HIM provides the host-side interface and contains dual-port, host target
channels for connection to host systems. The MSA2012fc has a Fibre Channel HIM
that supports 2- or 4-Gbit/sec link speed. The MSA2012i has an iSCSI HIM that
supports 1-Gbit/sec link speed.
The controller module contains three processing subsystems: the Storage Controller,
the Management Controller, and the Expander Controller.
Note - When a fault occurs in a controller module processor or a bus fault occurs
that is related to the controller module, the entire controller module FRU is
replaced.
Drive Expansion Module
Expansion module architecture is a simplified version of controller module
architecture. Like a controller module, an expansion module has an Expander
Controller and uses the SAS protocol. Each module has a SAS “In” port and a SAS
“Out” port, which enables up to four drive enclosures to be connected together, and
to a host system. When a fault occurs in the Expander Controller or a bus fault
occurs that is related to the expansion module, the entire module is replaced.
For information about supported configurations for connecting enclosures to each
other and to hosts, see the appropriate user guide.
18 HP StorageWorks 2000 Family Modular Smart Array troubleshooting guideMarch 2008
Power-and-Cooling Modules
Each enclosure contains two power-and-cooling modules. A power-and-cooling
module is a FRU that includes a power supply unit and two cooling fans. If a power
supply fault or fan fault occurs, the entire module is replaced.
Power Supply Unit
Each 750-Watt, AC power supply unit (PSU) is auto-sensing and runs in a load-
balanced configuration to ensure that the load is distributed evenly across both
power supplies.
Cooling Fans
The cooling fans are integrated into each of the power-and-cooling module FRUs.
Each module contains two fans mounted in tandem (series). The fans are powered
from the +12V common rail so that a single failed power supply still enables all
fans to continue to operate.
The fans cannot be accidentally removed as they are part of the power-and-cooling
module. Removing this module requires the disengagement of a captive panel
fastener and the operation of an ejector lever to remove it from the chassis.
Should one fan fail in either module, the system continues to operate indefinitely. In
addition, the fan system enables the airflow pattern to remain unchanged and there
is no pressure leak through the failed fan since there are always two fans in tandem,
and they are sealed to each other through a calibrated cavity. Should a power-and-
cooling module be turned off or unplugged, the fans inside the module continue to
operate at normal capacity. This is accomplished by powering each fan from a
power bus on the midplane.
The fans’ variable speed is controlled by the controller modules through an I2C
interface. The fans also provide tachometer speed information through the I2C
interface. Speed control is accomplished through the use of speed commands issued
from the controller module. The controller module has one temperature sensor at the
inlet port of the controller to sense the exhaust air temperature from the disk drives.
Should the controller module sense a rise in temperature, it can increase fan speed
to keep the disk drive temperatures within limits.
Balanced cooling for all of the drives is accomplished through the use of two
mechanisms.
Chapter 1 System Components 19
Tuned port apertures in the midplane placed behind each drive carrier slot
The use of a cavity behind the entire surface of the midplane (side-to-side and
top-to-bottom) that acts as an air pressure equalization chamber. This chamber is
commonly evacuated by all of the fans.
In this way the amount of mass flow through each drive slot is controlled to be the
same slot to slot.
Airflow is controlled and optimized over the power supply by using the power
supply chassis as the air-duct for the power supply, ensuring that there are no dead
air spaces in the power supply core and increasing the velocity flow (LFM) by
controlling the cross sectional area that the mass flow travels through.
Airflow is controlled and optimized over the RAID I/O board and HIM in a similar
manner. The controller cover is used as an air duct to force air over the entire
surface of the controller from front to back, ensuring no dead air spaces, and
increasing the velocity flow (LFM) by controlling the cross-sectional area that the
mass flow travels through.
Cooling for all hot components is passive. There are no other fans in the system
other than the fans contained in the power-and-cooling module.
Airflow
Caution - To allow for correct airflow and cooling, use an air management module
for removed FRUs. Do not leave a FRU out of its slot for more than two minutes.
As noted above, an enclosures cooling system includes four fans in a tandem
parallel array. These variable speed fans provide low noise and high mass flow
rates. Airflow is from front to back. Each drive slot draws ambient air in at the front
of the drive, sending air over the drive surfaces and then through tuned apertures in
the chassis midplane.
Note that the airflow washes over the top and bottom surface of the disk drive at
high mass flow and velocity flow rates, so both sides of the drive are used for
cooling. The airflow system uses a cavity in the chassis behind the midplane as an
air-pressure equalization chamber to normalize the negative pressure behind each of
the disk drive slots. This mechanism together with the tuned apertures in the
midplane behind each drive assures an even distribution of airflow and therefore
LFM for each drive slot. This even cooling extends the operational envelope of the
system by ensuring no “hot” drive bypass.
20 HP StorageWorks 2000 Family Modular Smart Array troubleshooting guideMarch 2008
Further, airflow is “in line” with the top and bottom surfaces of the drive to reduce
back-pressure and optimize fan performance. All of the mass flow at room ambient
is used for cooling the 12 disk drives. The high velocity flow helps to lower the
thermal resistance of the disk drive assembly to ambient temperature. The thermal
temperature rise of the disk drive is dependent upon the power consumed by the
disk drive, which varies by drive model as well as the level of drive activity.
21
CHAPTER2
Fault Isolation Methodology
The MSA2000 Family storage system provides many ways to isolate faults within
the system. This chapter presents the basic methodology used to locate faults and
the associated FRUs.
The basic fault isolation steps are:
Gather fault information
Determine where in the system the fault is occurring
Review event logs
If required, isolate the fault to a data path component
Gather Fault Information
When a fault occurs, it is important to gather as much information as possible.
Doing so will help you determine the correct action needed to remedy the fault.
Begin by reviewing the reported fault. Is the fault related to an internal data path or
an external data path? Is the fault related to a hardware component such as a drive
module, controller module, or power-and-cooling module? By isolating the fault to
one of the components within the storage system, you will be able to determine the
necessary action more rapidly.
Determine Where the Fault Is Occurring
Once you have an understanding of the reported fault, review the enclosure LEDs.
The enclosure LEDs are designed to alert users of any system faults and might be
what alerted the user to a fault in the first place.
When a fault occurs, the status LEDs on an enclosure’s right ear (see Figure 3-1)
illuminate. Check the LEDs on the back of the enclosure to narrow the fault to a
FRU, connection, or both. The LEDs also help you identify the location of a FRU
reporting a fault.
22 HP StorageWorks 2000 Family Modular Smart Array troubleshooting guideMarch 2008
Use SMU to verify any faults found while viewing the LEDs. SMU is also a good
tool to use in determining where the fault is occurring if the LEDs cannot be viewed
due to the location of the system. SMU provides you with a visual representation of
the system and where the fault is occurring. It can also provide more detailed
information about FRUs, data, and faults. For more information about LEDs, see
“Troubleshooting Using System LEDs” on page 23.
Review the Event Logs
The event logs record all system events. It is very important to review the logs, not
only to identify the fault, but also to search for events that might have caused the
fault to occur. For example, a host could lose connectivity to a virtual disk if a user
changes channel settings without taking the storage resources assigned to it into
consideration. In addition, the type of fault can help you isolate the problem to
hardware or software. For more information about event logs, see “Troubleshooting
Using Event Logs” on page 69.
Isolate the Fault
Occasionally it might become necessary to isolate a fault. This is particularly true
with data paths due to the number of components the data path consists of. For
example, if a host-side data error occurs, it could be caused by any of the
components in the data path: controller module, SFP, cable, switch, or data host. For
more information about isolating faults, see “Troubleshooting Using System LEDs”
on page 23.
23
CHAPTER3
Troubleshooting Using System LEDs
The first step in troubleshooting your storage system is to check the status of its
LEDs. System LEDs can help you identify the FRU that is experiencing a fault.
This chapter includes the following topics:
“LED Names and Locations” on page 23
“Using LEDs to Check System Status” on page 25
LED Names and Locations
This section identifies the LEDs in each FRU.
Figure 3-1 Enclosure and Drive Module LEDs
Drive modules are numbered by column top to bottom: 0-2, 3-5, 6-8, 9-11
Drive module LEDs (top to bottom)Enclosure ID Status LEDs (top to bottom):
UID
Fault ID
Heartbeat
Fault/UID
Online/activity
24 HP StorageWorks 2000 Family Modular Smart Array troubleshooting guideMarch 2008
Figure 3-2 MSA2012fc Controller Module LEDs
Figure 3-3 MSA2012i Controller Module LEDs
Figure 3-4 Expansion Module LEDs
10/100 BASE-T STATUS
ACTIVITY
DIRTY
CLEAN
CACHE CLI
Service
LINKSPEED LINK SPEED
FC
Port 0
FC
Port 1
Expansion
Cache status
Unit Locator
OK to Remove
OK
Fault/Service Required
port status
Host
activity
Ethernet link status
Ethernet activity
10/100 BASE-T STATUS
ACTIVITY
DIRTY
CLEAN
CACHE
CLI
Service
LINK ACT
iSCSI
Port 0
iSCSI
Port 1
LINK ACT
Host link activity
Host link status
Service
0 0
Chapter 3 Troubleshooting Using System LEDs 25
Figure 3-5 Power-and-Cooling Module LEDs
Using LEDs to Check System Status
Check the enclosure status LEDs periodically or after you have received an error
notification. If an amber LED is on, the enclosure has experienced a fault or failure.
The following topics describe what to do when an LED indicates a fault condition.
For descriptions of all LED statuses, see the user guide for your enclosure model.
“Using Enclosure Status LEDs” on page 26
“Using Drive Module LEDs” on page 26
“Using Controller Module Host Port LEDs” on page 27
“Using the Controller Module Expansion Port LED” on page 30
“Using Ethernet Management Port LEDs” on page 31
“Using Controller Module Status LEDs” on page 32
“Using Power-and-Cooling Module LEDs” on page 33
“Using Expansion Module LEDs” on page 33
AC Power Good
DC Voltage/Fan Fault/Service Required
26 HP StorageWorks 2000 Family Modular Smart Array troubleshooting guideMarch 2008
Using Enclosure Status LEDs
During normal operation, the Heartbeat LED is green, indicating that the enclosure
is powered on with at least one power-and-cooling module operating normally.
If the Heartbeat LED is off, the enclosure is not powered on. If the enclosure should
be powered on, verify that its power-and-cooling modules are properly cabled to an
active AC power sources and are switched on.
If the Fault ID is amber, an enclosure-level fault condition exists and service action is
required.
Using Drive Module LEDs
During normal operation, the Online/Activity LED is blinking and the Fault/UID
LED is off.
If the Online/Activity and Fault/UID LEDs are both off, either there is no power,
the drive is offline, or the drive is not configured. If the drive should be powered on,
check that it is fully inserted and latched in place, and that the enclosure is powered
on.
If the Fault/UID LED is blinking amber:
And the Online/Activity LED is off, the drive is offline. A predictive failure
alert has been received for this device. Further investigation is required.
And the Online/Activity LED is on, the drive is online, but there is no activity.
A predictive failure alert has been received for this device. Further investigation
is required.
And the Online/Activity LED is blinking, the drive is active, but a predictive
failure alert has been received for this device. Further investigation is required.
If the Online/Activity LED is blinking and the Fault/UID LED is off, the drive is
rebuilding. No action is required.
Caution - Do not remove a drive that is rebuilding. Removing a drive may
terminate the current operation and cause data loss.
Chapter 3 Troubleshooting Using System LEDs 27
If the Fault/UID LED is solid blue:
And the Online/Activity LED is off, the drive is offline and has been selected by
a management application.
And the Online/Activity LED is on or blinking, the drive is operating normally,
and it has been selected by a management application.
Using Controller Module Host Port LEDs
During normal operation, when a controller module host port is connected to a data
host, the port’s host link status LED and host link activity LED (iSCSI) are green.
For FC, if the link speed is set to 2 Gbit/sec the host link speed LED is off; for
4 Gbit/sec, it is green. If there is I/O activity, the host activity LED blinks green.
If data hosts are having trouble accessing the storage system, check the following.
If the host link status LED is green but the host link speed LED indicates the
wrong speed, in SMU select Manage > General Config > Host Port Configuration
and set the proper link speed.
If a connected port’s host link status LED is off, the link is down. In SMU,
review the event logs for indicators of a specific fault in a host data path
component. If you cannot locate a specific fault or cannot access the event logs, use
the procedure for your storage system model to isolate the fault:
“Isolating a Host-Side Connection Fault on a Fibre Channel Storage System” on
page27
“Isolating a Host-Side Connection Fault on an iSCSI Storage System” on page 29
Isolating a Host-Side Connection Fault on a Fibre
Channel Storage System
This procedure requires scheduled downtime.
Note - Do not perform more than one step at a time. Changing more than one
variable at a time can complicate the troubleshooting process.
1.Halt all I/O to the storage system.
2.Check the host activity LED.
If there is activity, halt all applications that access the storage system.
28 HP StorageWorks 2000 Family Modular Smart Array troubleshooting guideMarch 2008
3.Reseat the SFP and FC cable.
Is the host link status LED on?
Yes - Monitor the status to ensure that there is no intermittent error present. If
the fault occurs again, clean the connections to ensure that a dirty connector is
not interfering with the data path.
No - Proceed to the next step.
4.Move the SFP and cable to a port with a known good link status.
This step isolates the problem to the external data path (SFP, host cable, and host-
side devices) or to the controller module port.
Is the host link status LED on?
Yes - You now know that the SFP, host cable, and host-side devices are
functioning properly. Return the SFP and cable to the original port. If the link
status LED remains off, you have isolated the fault to the controller module’s
port. Replace the controller module.
No - Proceed to the next step.
5.Swap the SFP with the known good one.
Is the host link status LED on?
Yes - You have isolated the fault to the SFP. Replace the SFP.
No - Proceed to the next step.
6.Re-insert the original SFP and swap the cable with a known good one.
Is the host link status LED on?
Yes - You have isolated the fault to the cable. Replace the cable.
No - Proceed to the next step.
7.Replace the HBA with a known good HBA, or move the host side cable and SFP to
a known good HBA.
Is the host link status LED on?
Yes - You have isolated the fault to the HBA. Replace the HBA.
No - It is likely that the controller module needs to be replaced.
8.Move the cable and SFP back to its original port.
Is the host link status LED on?
No - The controller module’s port has failed. Replace the controller module.
Yes - Monitor the connection for a period of time. It may be an intermittent
problem, which can occur with SFPs, damaged cables, and HBAs.
Chapter 3 Troubleshooting Using System LEDs 29
Isolating a Host-Side Connection Fault on an iSCSI
Storage System
This procedure requires scheduled downtime.
Note - Do not perform more than one step at a time. Changing more than one
variable at a time can complicate the troubleshooting process.
1.Halt all I/O to the storage system.
2.Check the host activity LED.
If there is activity, halt all applications that access the storage system.
3.Reseat the iSCSI cable.
Is the host link status LED on?
Yes - Monitor the status to ensure that there is no intermittent error present. If
the fault occurs again, clean the connections to ensure that a dirty connector is
not interfering with the data path.
No - Proceed to the next step.
4.Move the cable to a port with a known good link status.
This step isolates the problem to the external data path (host cable and host-side
devices) or to the controller module port.
Is the host link status LED on?
Yes - You now know that the host cable and host-side devices are functioning
properly. Return the cable to the original port. If the link status LED remains off,
you have isolated the fault to the controller module’s port. Replace the controller
module.
No - Proceed to the next step.
5.Swap the cable with a known good one.
Is the host link status LED on?
Yes - You have isolated the fault to the cable. Replace the cable.
No - Proceed to the next step.
30 HP StorageWorks 2000 Family Modular Smart Array troubleshooting guideMarch 2008
6.Replace the HBA/NIC with a known good HBA/NIC, or move the host side cable to
a known good HBA/NIC.
Is the host link status LED on?
Yes - You have isolated the fault to the HBA/NIC. Replace the HBA/NIC.
No - It is likely that the controller module needs to be replaced.
7.Move the cable back to its original port.
Is the host link status LED on?
No - The controller module’s port has failed. Replace the controller module.
Yes - Monitor the connection for a period of time. It may be an intermittent
problem, which can occur with damaged cables and HBAs/NICs.
Using the Controller Module Expansion Port LED
During normal operation, when a controller module’s expansion port is connected to
an drive enclosure, the expansion port status LED is green.
If the connected port’s LED is off, the link down. In SMU, review the event logs
for indicators of a specific fault. If you cannot locate a specific fault or cannot
access the event logs, use the following procedure to isolate the fault.
This procedure requires scheduled downtime.
Note - Do not perform more than one step at a time. Changing more than one
variable at a time can complicate the troubleshooting process.
1.Halt all I/O to the storage system.
2.Check the host activity LED.
If there is activity, halt all applications that access the storage system.
3.Reseat the expansion cable.
Is the expansion port status LED on?
Yes - Monitor the status to ensure there is no intermittent error present. If the
fault occurs again, clean the connections to ensure that a dirty connector is not
interfering with the data path.
No - Proceed to Step 4.
Chapter 3 Troubleshooting Using System LEDs 31
4.Move the expansion cable to a port on the RAID enclosure with a known good link
status.
This step isolates the problem to the expansion cable or to the controller module’s
expansion port.
Is the expansion port status LED on?
Yes - You now know that the expansion cable is good. Return cable to the
original port. If the expansion port status LED remains off, you have isolated
the fault to the controller module’s expansion port. Replace the controller
module.
No - Proceed to the next step.
5.Move the expansion cable back to the original port on the controller enclosure.
6.Move the expansion cable on the drive enclosure to a known good expansion port
on the drive enclosure.
Is the expansion port status LED on?
Yes - You have isolated the problem to the drive enclosure’s port. Replace the
expansion module.
No - Proceed to Step 6.
7.Replace the cable with a known good cable, ensuring the cable is attached to the
original ports used by the previous cable.
Is the host link status LED on?
Yes - Replace the original cable. The fault has been isolated.
No - It is likely that the controller module needs to be replaced
Using Ethernet Management Port LEDs
During normal operation, when a controller module’s Ethernet management port is
connected, its Ethernet link status LED is green. If there is I/O activity, the host
activity LED blinks green.
If a management host is having trouble accessing the storage system, check the
following.
If a connected port’s Ethernet link status LED is off, the link is down. Use
standard networking troubleshooting procedures to isolate faults on the network.
32 HP StorageWorks 2000 Family Modular Smart Array troubleshooting guideMarch 2008
Using Controller Module Status LEDs
During normal operation, the OK LED is green, the cache status LED can be green
or off, and the other controller module status LEDs are off.
If the OK LED is off, either:
The controller module is not powered on. If it should be powered on, check that
it is fully inserted and latched in place, and that the enclosure is powered on.
The controller module has failed. Check the event log for specific information
regarding the failure.
If the Fault/Service Required LED is steady amber, a fault occurred or service
action is required.
If the Cache status LED is blinking green, a cache flush or self-refresh is in
progress. No action is needed.
If the LED is blinking evenly, a cache flush is in progress. When a controller
module loses power and write cache is dirty (contains data that has not been
written to disk), the super-capacitor pack provides backup power to flush (copy)
data from write cache to Compact Flash memory. When cache flush is complete,
the cache transitions into self-refresh mode.
If the LED is blinking slowly, a cache flush is in progress. In self-refresh mode, if
primary power is restored before the backup power is depleted (3-30 minutes
depending on various factors), the system boots, finds data preserved in cache,
and writes it to disk. This means the system can be operational within 30
seconds, and before the typical host I/O timeout of 60 seconds at which point
system failure would cause host-application failure. If primary power is restored
after the backup power is depleted, the system boots and restores data to cache
from Compact Flash, which can take about 90 seconds.
Note - The cache flush and self-refresh mechanism is an important data protection
feature; essentially four copies of user data are preserved: one in each controller's
cache and one in each controller's Compact Flash.
If the Fault/Service Required LED is blinking amber, one of the following errors
occurred:
Hardware-controlled power-up error
Cache flush error
Cache self-refresh error
If the OK to Remove LED is blue, the controller module is prepared for removal.
Chapter 3 Troubleshooting Using System LEDs 33
Using Power-and-Cooling Module LEDs
During normal operation, the AC Power Good LED is green.
If the AC Power Good LED is off, the module is not receiving adequate power.
Verify that the power cord is properly connected and check the power source it is
connected to.
If the DC Voltage/Fan Fault/Service Required LED is amber, the power supply
unit or a fan is operating at an unacceptable voltage/RPM level, or has failed. When
isolating faults in the power-and-cooling module, remember that the fans in both
modules receive power through a common bus on the midplane so if a power supply
unit fails, the fans continue to operate normally.
Using Expansion Module LEDs
During normal operation, when the expansion module is connected to a controller
module or a host, the SAS In port status LED is green. If the SAS Out port is
connected to another expansion module, the SAS Out port status LED is also green.
The other LEDs are off.
If a connected port’s status LED is off, the link is down. In SMU, review the
event logs for indicators of a specific fault in a host data path component.
If the OK LED is off, either:
The expansion module is not powered on. If it should be powered on, check that
it is fully inserted and latched in place, and that the enclosure is powered on.
The expansion module has failed. Check the event log for specific information
regarding the failure.
If the Fault/Service Required LED is steady amber, a fault occurred or service
action is required.
If the Fault/Service Required LED is blinking amber, one of the following errors
occurred:
Hardware-controlled power-up error
Cache flush error
Cache self-refresh error
34 HP StorageWorks 2000 Family Modular Smart Array troubleshooting guideMarch 2008
35
CHAPTER4
Troubleshooting Using SMU
This chapter describes how to use SMU to troubleshoot your storage system and its
FRUs. It also describes solutions to problems you might experience when using
SMU.
Topics covered in this chapter include:
“Correcting Enclosure IDs” on page 35
“Determining Storage System Status and Verifying Faults” on page 36
“Stopping I/O” on page 37
“Isolating Faulty Disk Drives” on page 38
“Isolating Data Path Faults” on page 43
“Isolating Disk Drive Faults” on page 50
“Clearing Metadata From Leftover Disk Drives” on page 51
“Using Diagnostic Functions” on page 52
“Using Recovery and Debug Utilities” on page 62
“Problems Using SMU to Access a Storage System” on page 65
“Problems Scheduling Tasks” on page 66
Note - You can also use the CLI to troubleshoot your storage system.
“Troubleshooting Using the CLI” on page 119 provides information on specific CLI
commands that can be used to troubleshoot your system.
Correcting Enclosure IDs
When installing a system with drive enclosures attached, the enclosure IDs might
not agree with the physical cabling order. This is because the controller might have
been previously attached to some of the same enclosures and it attempts to preserve
the previous enclosure IDs if possible. To correct this condition, make sure that both
controllers are up and perform a rescan. This will reorder the enclosures, but can
take up to two minutes for the enclosure IDs to be corrected.
36 HP StorageWorks 2000 Family Modular Smart Array troubleshooting guideMarch 2008
To rescan using SMU, as an Advanced Manage user:
1.Select Manage > Utilities > Disk Drive Utilities > Rescan.
In the Rescan For Devices panel, click Rescan.
Determining Storage System Status and Verifying
Faults
The System Summary page shows you the overall status of the storage system.
System preferences might be set to display this page when you log in, otherwise you
can select it from the menu.
To view storage system status:
1.Select Monitor > Status > Status Summary.
2.Check the status icon at the upper left corner of each panel.
A green icon indicates that components associated with that panel are
operating normally.
A red icon with an exclamation point indicates that at least one component
associated with that panel has a fault and is operating in a degraded state or is
offline.
Figure 4-1 Status Summary Page with a Fault Identified by Status Icons
Chapter 4 Troubleshooting Using SMU 37
3.Review each panel that has a fault icon.
4.Look for red text in the panels.
Red text indicates where the fault is occurring. In Figure 4-1 for example, the panels
indicate a fault related to controller module B.
5.To gather more details regarding the failure, click linked text next to the fault icon.
The associated status page is displayed.
6.Review the information displayed in the status page.
If the fault relates to a controller module or power module, an image of the
enclosure is displayed.
The module is shaded red if it has a fault or is powered off.
The module is overlaid with the words “NOT INSTALLED” if it is absent or not
fully inserted.
Stopping I/O
When troubleshooting drive and connectivity faults, ensure you have a current full
backup. As an additional data protection precaution, stop all I/O to the affected
virtual disks. When on-site, you can verify that there is no I/O activity by briefly
monitoring the system LEDs; however, when accessing the storage system remotely,
this is not possible.
To check the I/O status of a remote system, use the Monitor > Statistics > Overall
Rate Stats page. The Overall Rate Stats page enables you to view I/O based on the
host-side activity interval since the page was last refreshed. The page automatically
refreshes at a 60-second interval. The following data is presented for all virtual
disks:
The total IOPS and bandwidth for all virtual disks
The IOPS and bandwidth for each virtual disk
38 HP StorageWorks 2000 Family Modular Smart Array troubleshooting guideMarch 2008
To use the Overall Rate Stats page to ensure that all I/O has ceased on a remote
system:
1.Quiesce host applications that access the storage system.
2.Select Monitor > Statistics > Overall Rate Stats.
3.Click your browser’s refresh button to ensure that current data is displayed.
4.In the Host-Generated I/O & Bandwidth Totals for All Virtual Disks panel, verify
that both indicators display 0 (no activity).
Isolating Faulty Disk Drives
When a drive fault occurs, basic troubleshooting actions are:
Identify the faulty drive
Review the drive error statistics
Review the event log
Replace the faulty drive
Reconstruct the associated virtual disk
Identifying a Faulty Disk Drive
The identification of a faulty disk drive involves confirming the drive fault and
identifying the physical location of the drive.
To confirm a drive fault, use the basic troubleshooting steps in “Correcting
Enclosure IDs” on page 35. You can also navigate to the Monitor > Status > Show
Notification page and look for any notifications pertaining to a disk drive fault.
When you have confirmed a drive fault, record the drive’s enclosure number and
slot number.
Chapter 4 Troubleshooting Using SMU 39
To identify the physical location of a faulty drive:
1.Select Manage > Utilities > Disk Drive Utilities > Locate Disk Drive.
2.Select the faulty drive.
If the drive is absent or not fully inserted, it is represented with a white rectangle
and is not selectable, as shown in the following example.
3.Click Update LED Illumination.
The upper LED on the selected drive illuminates a solid blue.
For more information about viewing drive information, see the reference guide.
Reviewing Disk Drive Error Statistics
The Disk Error Stats page provides specific drive fault information. It shows a
graphical representation of the enclosures and disks installed in the system. The
Disk Error Stats page can be used to gather drive information and to identify
specific drive errors. Additionally, you can capture intermittent errors.
To view the disk drive error statistics:
1.Select Monitor > Statistics > Disk Error Stats.
The top panel displays all enclosures and drives in the storage system.
2.Select the drive whose error statistics you want to view.
3.Click Show Disk Drive Error Statistics.
The drive error data for the selected disk is displayed in the second panel.
40 HP StorageWorks 2000 Family Modular Smart Array troubleshooting guideMarch 2008
4.Note any error counts displayed for these statistics.
Field Description
SMART Event Count The number of SMART (Self-Monitoring, Analysis, and
Reporting Technology) events that the drive recorded.
These events are often used by the vendor to determine
the root cause of a drive failure. Some SMART events
may indicate imminent electromechanical failure.
I/O Timeout Count The number of times the drive accepted an I/O request
but did not complete it in the required amount of time.
Excessive timeouts can indicate potential device failure
(media retries or soft, recoverable errors)
No Response Count The number of times the drive failed to respond to an I/O
request. A high value can indicate that the drive is too
busy to respond to further requests.
Spin-up Retries The number of times the drive failed to start on power-up
or on a software request. Excessive spin-up retries can
indicate that a drive is close to failing.
Media Errors The number of times the drive had to retry an I/O
operation because the media did not successfully
record/retrieve the data correctly.
Non Media Errors The number of soft, recoverable errors that are not
associated with drive media.
Bad Block Reassignments The number of block reassignments that have taken place
since the drive was shipped from the vendor. A large
number of reallocations in a short period of time could
indicate a serious condition.
Bad Block List Size The number of blocks that have been deemed defective
either from the vendor or over time due to reallocation.
Chapter 4 Troubleshooting Using SMU 41
Capturing Error Trend Data
To capture error trend data for one or more drives:
1.Perform the procedure in “Reviewing Disk Drive Error Statistics” on page 39.
2.Create a baseline by clearing the current error statistics.
To clear the statistics for one drive, select the drive and click Clear Selected Disk
Drive Error Statistics. To clear the statistics for all drives, click Clear All Disk
Drive Error Statistics. You cannot clear the Bad Block List Size statistic.
If a faulty drive is present, errors are captured in a short period of time. If the drive
has intermittent errors you might have to monitor the storage system for more than
24 hours.
3.To view the error statistics, select the suspected drive and click Show Disk Drive
Error Statistics.
4.Review the Disk Drive Error Statistics panel for drive errors.
The Disk Drive Error Statistics panel enables you to review errors from each of the
two ports.
Reviewing the Event Logs
If all the steps in “Identifying a Faulty Disk Drive” on page 38 and “Reviewing
Disk Drive Error Statistics” on page 39 have been performed, you have determined
the following:
A disk drive has encountered a fault
The location of the disk drive
What the fault is
The next step is to review the event logs to determine if there were any events that
led to the fault. If you skip this step, you could replace the faulty drive and then
encounter another fault.
To view the event logs from any page, click the icon in the System Panel.
See “Troubleshooting Using Event Logs” on page 69 for more information about
using event logs.
42 HP StorageWorks 2000 Family Modular Smart Array troubleshooting guideMarch 2008
Reconstructing a Virtual Disk
If one or more drives fail in a redundant virtual disk (RAID 1, 3, 5, 6, 10, or 50) and
properly sized spares are available, the storage system automatically uses the spares
to reconstruct the virtual disk. Virtual disk reconstruction does not require I/O to be
quiesced, so the virtual disk can continue to be used while the Reconstruct utility
runs.
A properly sized spare is one whose capacity is equal to or greater than the smallest
drive in the virtual disk. If no properly sized spares are available, reconstruction
does not start automatically. To start reconstruction manually, replace each failed
drive and then do one of the following:
Add each new drive as a vdisk spare (Manage > Virtual Disk Config > Vdisk
Configuration > Add Vdisk Spares) or a global spare (Manage > Virtual Disk
Config > Global Spare Menu > Add Global Spares). Remember that a global
spare might be taken by a different critical virtual disk than the one you intended.
Enable the Dynamic Spare Configuration option on the Manage > General Config
> System Configuration page to use the new drives without designating them as
spares.
Reconstructing a RAID-6 virtual disk to a fault-tolerant state requires two properly
sized spares to be available.
If two drives fail and only one properly sized spare is available, an event
indicates that reconstruction is about to start. The Reconstruct utility starts to run,
using the spare, but its progress remains at 0% until a second properly sized spare
is available.
If a drive fails during online initialization, the initialization fails. In order to
generate the two sets of parity that RAID 6 requires, the RAID controller fails a
second drive in the virtual disk, which changes the virtual disk status to Critical,
and then assigns that disk as a spare for the virtual disk. The Reconstruct utility
starts to run, using the spare, but its progress remains at 0% until a second
properly sized spare is available.
The second available spare can be an existing global spare, another existing spare
for the virtual disk, or a replacement drive that you designate as a spare or that is
automatically taken when dynamic sparing is enabled.
During reconstruction, though the critical virtual disk icon is displayed, you can
continue to use the virtual disk. When a global spare replaces a drive in a virtual
disk, the global spare’s icon in the enclosure view changes to match the other drives
in that virtual disk.
Chapter 4 Troubleshooting Using SMU 43
Note - Reconstruction can take hours or days to complete, depending on the virtual
disk RAID level and size, drive speed, utility priority, and other processes running
on the storage system. You can stop reconstruction only by deleting the virtual disk.
Isolating Data Path Faults
When isolating data path faults, you must first isolate the fault to an internal data
path or an external data path. This will help to target your troubleshooting efforts.
Internal data paths include the following:
Controller to disk connectivity
Controller to controller connectivity
Controller ingress (incoming signals from drive enclosures)
Controller egress (outgoing signals to drive enclosures)
External data paths consist of the connections between the storage system and data
hosts.
To troubleshoot a data path using SMU, do the following:
Identify the fault as an internal or external data path fault using the steps in
“Correcting Enclosure IDs” on page 35
Gather details about the fault
Review event logs
Replace the faulty component
Isolating Internal Data Path Faults
A Physical Layer Interface (PHY) is an interface in a device used to connect to
other devices. The term refers to the physical layer of the Open Systems
Interconnect (OSI) basic reference model. The physical layer defines all of the
electrical and physical specifications for a device.
In a SAS architecture, each physical point-to-point connection is called a lane.
Every lane has a PHY at either end. Lanes are sometimes referred to as physical
links.
Fault isolation firmware monitors hardware PHYs for problems.
44 HP StorageWorks 2000 Family Modular Smart Array troubleshooting guideMarch 2008
PHYs are tested and verified before shipment as part of the manufacturing and
qualification process. But subsequent problems can occur in a PHY because of
installation problems such as:
A bad cable between enclosures
A controller connector that is damaged as a result of attaching a cable and then
torquing the cable connector until solder joints connecting the controller
connector become fatigued or break
Problem PHYs can cause a host or controller to continually rescan drives, which
disrupts I/O or causes I/O errors. I/O errors can result in a failed drive, causing a
virtual disk to become critical or causing complete loss of a virtual disk if more than
one fails.
To avoid these problems, problem PHYs are identified and disabled, if necessary,
and status information is transmitted to the controller so that each action can be
reported in the event log. Problem PHY identification and status information is
reported in SMU, but disabled PHYs are only reported through event messages.
Some PHY errors can be expected when powering on an enclosure, when removing
or inserting a controller, and when connecting or disconnecting an enclosure. An
incompletely connected or disturbed cable might also generate a PHY error. These
errors are usually not significant enough to disable a PHY, so the fault isolation
firmware analyzes the number of errors and the error rate. If errors for a particular
PHY increase at a slow rate, the PHY is usually not disabled. Instead the errors are
accumulated and reported.
On the other hand, bad cables connecting enclosures, damaged controller
connectors, and other physical damage can cause continual errors, which the fault
isolation firmware can often trace to a single problematic PHY. The fault isolation
firmware recognizes the large number and rapid rate of these errors and disables this
PHY without user intervention. This disabling, sometimes referred to as PHY
fencing, eliminates the I/O errors and enables the system to continue operation
without suffering performance degradation.
Once the firmware has disabled a PHY, the only way to enable the PHY again is to
reset the affected controller or power cycle the enclosure. Before doing so, it may be
necessary to replace a defective cable or FRU.
If a PHY becomes disabled, the event log entry helps to determine which enclosure
or enclosures and which controller (or controllers) are affected.
Chapter 4 Troubleshooting Using SMU 45
SMU provides an Expander Status page, which contains an Expander Controller Phy
Detail panel. This panel shows information about each PHY in the internal data
paths between the Storage Controller, Expander Controller, drives, and expansion
ports. By reviewing this page you can quickly locate the internal data path that has
a fault.
Checking PHY Status
SMU's Expander Status page includes an Expander Controller PHY Detail panel.
This panel shows the internal data paths that show the data paths for the Storage
Controller, Expander Controller, disks, and expansion ports. Review this page to
locate an internal data path that has a fault.
To view expander status information:
1.Select Monitor > Status > Advanced Settings > Expander Status.
2.Select an enclosure.
The Enclosure Details panel shows the following information about the enclosure:
name, vendor, location, status, enclosure ID, World Wide Name, model, rack and
position numbers, and firmware version. For details, see the page help.
3.Review the Expander Controller Phy Detail panel.
This panel shows the following information about each PHY:
Status - Specifies one of the following:
OK - The PHY is healthy.
Error - The PHY experienced an unrecoverable error condition or received an
unsupported PHY status value.
Disabled - The PHY has been disabled by a Diagnostic Manage user or by the
system.
Non-Critical - The PHY is not coming to a ready state or the PHY at the other
end of the cable is disabled.
Not Used - The module is not installed.
Type - Specifies one of the following:
Disk - Communicates between the expander and a disk drive.
Inter-Exp - (Controller module only) Communicates between the expander
and the partner’s expander.
Ingress - Communicates between the EC and the expander.
Egress - Communicates between the expander and an expansion port or SAS
Out port.
46 HP StorageWorks 2000 Family Modular Smart Array troubleshooting guideMarch 2008
State - Specifies whether the PHY is enabled or disabled.
ID - Identifies a PHY's logical location within a group based on the PHY type.
Logical IDs are 0-11 for disk PHYs and 0-3 for inter-expander, egress, and
ingress PHYs.
Details - Pause the cursor over or click the information icon to view a popup
with more information. If you click the icon, the information remains shown until
the cursor passes over a similar icon.
Status - The same status value shown in the panel's Status field.
Physical Phy ID - Identifies a PHY's physical location in the expander.
Type - The same type value shown in the panel's Type field.
Phy Change Count - Specifies the number of times the PHY originated a
BROADCAST (CHANGE). A BROADCAST (CHANGE) is sent if
doubleword synchronization is lost or at the end of a Link Reset sequence.
Code Violation Count - Specifies the number of times the PHY received an
unrecognized or unexpected signal.
Disparity Error Count - Specifies the number of doublewords containing
running disparity errors that have been received by the PHY, not including
those received during Link Reset sequences. A running disparity error occurs
when positive and negative values in a signal don't alternate.
CRC Error Count - In a sequence of SAS transfers (frames), the data is
protected by a cyclic redundancy check (CRC) value. This error count
specifies the number of times the computed CRC does not match the CRC
stored in the frame, which indicates that the frame might have been corrupted
in transit.
Inter-Connect Error Count - Specifies the number of times the lane between
two expanders experienced a communication error.
Lost Doubleword Count - Specifies the number of times the PHY has lost
doubleword synchronization and restarted the Link Reset sequence.
Invalid Doubleword Count - Specifies the number of invalid doublewords that
have been received by the PHY, not including those received during Link
Reset sequences.
Reset Error Count - Specifies the number of times the expander performed a
reset.
Phy Disabled - Specifies whether the PHY is enabled (True) or disabled
(False).
Fault Reason - A coded value that explains why the EC isolated the PHY. If
the PHY is active, this value is 0x0.
Chapter 4 Troubleshooting Using SMU 47
When working with intermittent errors, you might want to reset PHY status so that
you can observe error trend information. A Diagnostic Manage user can do this on
the Expander Isolation page.
1.Select Manage > Utilities > Diagnostic Tools > Expander Isolation.
The Expander Isolation page is similar to the Expander Status page, but enables you
to reset expander error counters, manually disable or enable individual PHYs, and
disable or enable PHY fault isolation.
2.Select an enclosure.
3.Note the PHY that is currently in error.
4.Click Clear Errors to reset PHY error counters.
When the error recurs, review the Expander Controller Phy Detail page for any
changes. The error counters display only the errors that occurred in the interval
between the clearing PHY statuses and the current time.
For more information about the Expander Isolation page, see “Changing Fault
Isolation and PHY Settings” on page 61.
Reviewing the Event Log for Disabled PHYs
If the fault isolation firmware disables a PHY, the event log shows a message like
the following:.
When a PHY has been disabled manually, the event log shows a similar message
with a different reason:
Phy disabled. Enclosure:A00. Phy11. PhysId11 Type:Drive.
Reason:Externally Disabled.
Phy disabled. Enclosure:A00. Phy11. PhysId11. Type:Drive.
Reason:Ctrl Page Disabled.
48 HP StorageWorks 2000 Family Modular Smart Array troubleshooting guideMarch 2008
Resolving PHY Faults
1.Ensure that the cables are securely connected. If they are not, tighten the connectors.
2.Reset the affected controller or power-cycle the enclosure.
3.If the problem persists, replace the affected FRU or enclosure.
4.Periodically examine the Expander Status page to see if the fault isolation firmware
disables the same PHY again. If it does:
a.Replace the appropriate cable.
b. Reset the affected controller or power-cycle the enclosure.
Isolating External Data Path Faults on a Fibre
Channel Storage System
To troubleshoot external data path faults, perform the following steps:
1.Select Monitor > Status > Advanced Settings > Host Port Status.
This page provides a graphical representation of controller host port status and port
details.
2.Review the graphical representation of host port status.
Green - Host link is up
Red - Host link is down
White - Port is unused and does not contain an SFP
An indication of link down can be caused by one or more of the following
conditions:
A faulty HBA in the host
A faulty Fibre Channel cable
A faulty SFP
A faulty port in the host interface module
A disconnected cable
3.To target the cause of the link failure, view the host port details by clicking on a
port in the graphical view and then reviewing the details listed below it.
The data displayed includes:
Host Port Status Details - Selected controller and port number.
SFP Detect - SFP is present or not present. An SFP is used to connect the FC
host port through an FC cable to another FC device.
Chapter 4 Troubleshooting Using SMU 49
Receive Signal - Signal is present or not present.
Link Status - Link is up (active) or down (inactive).
Signal Detect - Signal is detected or no signal.
Topology - One of the following values:
Point-to-Point
Loop, if the loop is inactive
Private Loop, if the port is directly attached to a host
Public Loop, if the port is attached to a switch
Speed - 2 Gbit/sec or 4 Gbit/sec.
FC Address - 24-bit FC address, or Unavailable if the FC link is not active.
Node WWN - Controller module node World Wide Name.
Port WWN - Port World Wide Name.
Isolating External Data Path Faults on an iSCSI
Storage System
To troubleshoot external data path faults, perform the following steps:
1.Select Monitor > Status > Advanced Settings > Host Port Status.
This page provides a graphical representation of controller host port status and port
details.
2.Review the graphical representation of host port status.
Green - Host link is up
White - Host link is down
An indication of link down can be caused by one or more of the following
conditions:
A faulty HBA or NIC in the host
A faulty Fibre Channel cable
A faulty port in the host interface module
A disconnected cable
50 HP StorageWorks 2000 Family Modular Smart Array troubleshooting guideMarch 2008
3.To target the cause of the link failure, view the host port details by clicking on a
port in the graphical view and then reviewing the details listed below it.
The data displayed includes:
iSCSI Port Status Details - Selected controller and port number
Link Status - Link is up (active) or down (inactive)
Qualified Name - iSCSI qualified name (IQN)
Link Speed - 1 Gbit/sec
IP Version - IP addressing version; 4 for IPv4
IP Address - Port IP address
IP Mask - Port IP subnet mask
IP Gateway - Port gateway IP address
Service Port - iSCSI port number
Hardware Address - Port MAC address
Resetting a Host Channel on a Fibre Channel
Storage System
For a Fibre Channel system using FC-AL (loop) topology, you might need to reset a
host link to fix a host connection or configuration problem. You can use this
command to remotely issue a loop initialization primitive (LIP) on specified
controller channels.
To reset host channels:
1.Select Manage > Utilities > Host Utilities > Reset Host Channel.
2.Set the channel and controller options.
3.Click Reset Host Channel.
Isolating Disk Drive Faults
For information regarding the isolation of faults for disk drives see “Isolating Faulty
Disk Drives” on page 38.
Chapter 4 Troubleshooting Using SMU 51
Clearing Metadata From Leftover Disk Drives
If a disk drive’s metadata identifies it as part of a nonexistent virtual disk, the drive
is considered a leftover. SMU reports the drive’s virtual disk as Leftover and shows
the drive as follows in enclosure view:
The storage system uses metadata to identify virtual disk members after restarting or
replacing enclosures. A drive becomes a leftover when it is removed from the
enclosure where that drive is part of a virtual disk, and either the virtual disk is
deleted and the drive is reinserted, or the drive is inserted in a different system.
Before you can use the drive a different virtual disk or as a spare, you must clear the
metadata.
To clear metadata from drives:
1.Select Manage > Utilities > Disk Drive Utilities > Clear Metadata.
An enclosure view is displayed in which only Leftover and Available drives are
selectable. Available drives are considered to have had their metadata cleared, but
are selectable in case a drive with partial metadata has been inserted into the system.
2.Select the drives whose metadata you want to clear.
3.Click Clear Metadata For Selected Disk Drives.
52 HP StorageWorks 2000 Family Modular Smart Array troubleshooting guideMarch 2008
Using Diagnostic Functions
To use SMU functions covered in this section, you must be logged in as a
Diagnostic Manage user.
“Trusting a Virtual Disk for Disaster Recovery” on page52
“Viewing the Debug Log” on page53
“Viewing Crash and Boot Data” on page 53
“Viewing a CAPI Command Trace” on page 55
“Viewing a Management Trace” on page 56
“Selecting Individual Events for Notification” on page 57
“Selecting or Clearing All Events for Notification” on page 58
“Enabling Service Interfaces” on page 59
“Restoring Management Controller Defaults Only” on page 60
“Changing Fault Isolation and PHY Settings” on page 61
Trusting a Virtual Disk for Disaster Recovery
If a virtual disk appears to be down or offline (not quarantined) and its drives are
labeled “Leftover,” use the Trust Virtual Disk function to recover the virtual disk.
The Trust Virtual Disk function brings a virtual disk back online by ignoring
metadata that indicates the drives might not form a coherent virtual disk. This
function can force an offline virtual disk to be critical or fault tolerant, or a critical
virtual disk to be fault tolerant. You might need to do this when:
A drive was removed or was marked as failed in a virtual disk due to
circumstances you have corrected (such as accidentally removing the wrong
disk). In this case, one or more drives in a virtual disk can start up more slowly,
or might have been powered on after the rest of the drives in the virtual disk.
This causes the date and time stamps to differ, which the storage system
interprets as a problem. Also see “Dequarantining a Virtual Disk” on page 62.
A virtual disk is offline because a drive is failing, you have no data backup, and
you want to try to recover the data from the virtual disk. In this case, the Trust
Virtual Disk function might work, but only as long as the failing drive continues
to operate.
Caution - If used improperly, the Trust Virtual Disk feature can cause unstable
operation and data loss. Only use this function for disaster recovery purposes and
when advised to do so by a service technician. The virtual disk has no tolerance for
any additional failures.
Chapter 4 Troubleshooting Using SMU 53
To enable and use Trust Vdisk:
1.Select Manage > Utilities > Recovery Utilities > Enable Trust Vdisk.
2.Select Enabled.
3.Click Enable/Disable Trust Vdisk.
The option remains enabled until you trust a virtual disk or restart the storage
system.
4.Select Manage > Utilities > Recovery Utilities > Trust Vdisk.
5.Select the virtual disk and click Trust This Vdisk.
6.Back up the data from all the volumes residing on this virtual disk and audit it to
make sure that it is intact.
7.Select Manage > Virtual Disk Config > Verify Virtual Disk. While the verify utility
is running, any new data written to any of the volumes on the virtual disk is written
in a parity-consistent way.
Note - If the virtual disk does not come back online, it might be that too many
drives are offline or the virtual disk might have additional failures on the bus or
enclosure that Trust Vdisk cannot fix.
Viewing the Debug Log
To set up and view the debug log using SMU, see “Configuring the Debug Log” on
page73.
Viewing Crash and Boot Data
To help you diagnose problems, you can view crash and boot buffer data.
During normal operation, the Management Controller communicates with the
Storage Controller. If there are problems with this communication, there is little
information available to the Management Controller to show. In this case and under
certain failure conditions, crash and boot buffer data saved by the Management
Controller can be examined on this page. For normal operation, these buffers are
empty.
54 HP StorageWorks 2000 Family Modular Smart Array troubleshooting guideMarch 2008
To view debug buffer data:
Select Manage > Utilities > Debug Utilities > View Error Buffers.
If the buffers contain debug data, it is displayed. Otherwise, the page shows that
there is no debug data.
To save this data to a file, see “Saving Log Information to a File” on page 63.
Chapter 4 Troubleshooting Using SMU 55
Viewing a CAPI Command Trace
To help you diagnose problems, you can view the Configuration API (CAPI)
commands sent and received by the Management Controller. For example, if a
command to create a virtual disk fails, the trace shows the request to create the
virtual disk and the reason why it failed. The View CAPI Trace page provides detail
for the underlying action that supports the failed function.
The upper panel has the following fields:
Requested Lines To Display - A selectable number of lines to display in the
trace. Allowed values are 50, 100, 200, 300, 400, 500 (all). The default is 200.
CAPI Trace Snap Shot Time - The date and time when the trace was generated.
Lines Displayed - The number of lines displayed in the trace, one greater than
the Requested Lines To Display value.
CAPI Time Span - The times of the first and last commands in the trace.
The lower panel shows the trace data.
To view the CAPI trace:
Select Manage > Utilities > Debug Utilities > View CAPI Trace.
The CAPI command trace data is displayed.
To update the trace data, click Load/Reload CAPI Command Trace. The trace data
and related values in the upper panel are updated.
To save this data to a file, see “Saving Log Information to a File” on page63.
56 HP StorageWorks 2000 Family Modular Smart Array troubleshooting guideMarch 2008
Viewing a Management Trace
To help you diagnose problems, you can view a debug trace for the Management
Controller (MC). It traces activity in the MC and between the MC and other
controller processors.
To view the management trace:
1.Select Manage > Utilities > Debug Utilities > View Mgmt Trace.
2.Click Load/Reload Debug Trace.
The LAN Debug Trace panel is displayed and the trace time is updated in the
Management Controller Debug Trace panel.
Because the debug trace can be large, only the most recent 100 entries are
displayed.
To view all trace entries and save this data to a file, see “Saving Log Information to
a File” on page 63.
Chapter 4 Troubleshooting Using SMU 57
Selecting Individual Events for Notification
As described in the reference guide, you can configure how and under what
conditions the storage system alerts you when specific events occur. In addition to
selecting event categories, as a Diagnostic Manage user, you can select individual
events that you want to be notified of.
Note - Selecting many individual events can result in the system sending numerous
event notifications. Select the categories and individual events that are most
important to you.
Use this method when you want to track or watch for a specific event. You can also
use it to receive notification of specific functions being started or completed, such
as reconstruction or completion of initialization.
Individual event selections do not override the Notification Enabled or Event
Categories settings as explained in the reference guide. If the notification is
disabled, the individual event selection is ignored. Similarly, Event Categories
settings have higher precedence for enabling events than individual event selection.
If the critical event category is selected, all critical events cause a notification
regardless of the individual critical event selection. You can select individual events
to fine-tune notification either instead of or in addition to selecting event categories.
For example, you can select the critical event category to be notified of all critical
events, and then select additional individual warning and informational events.
To select events for notification:
1.Select Manage > Event Notification > Select Individual Events.
The Critical Events page is displayed.
2.From the Manage menu, display the page for the type of event you want to track:
Critical Events - Represent serious device status changes that might require
immediate intervention.
Warning Events - Represent device status changes that might require attention.
Informational Virtual Disk Events - Represent device status changes related to
virtual disks that usually do not require attention.
Informational Drive Events - Represent device status changes related to disk
drives that do not require attention.
Informational Health Events - Represent device status changes related to the
storage system’s health that usually do not require attention.
58 HP StorageWorks 2000 Family Modular Smart Array troubleshooting guideMarch 2008
Informational Status Events - Represent device status changes related to the
storage system’s status that usually do not require attention.
Informational Configuration Events - Represent device status changes related to
the storage system’s configuration that usually do not require attention.
Informational Miscellaneous Events - Represent device status changes related to
informational events that usually do not require attention.
3.Select events by clicking the corresponding check box in the column.
4.For each event you want to be notified of, select a notification method.
For a description of each notification method, see the reference guide.
5.Click the change events button.
Selecting or Clearing All Events for Notification
You can select or clear all individual events for any or all of the notification types.
Selecting all individual events is useful if you want to select many events but not
all; set all the events on this page, then go to pages for individual events and clear
events you don't want.
Clearing all individual events is useful if you want to clear all the individual event
settings so you can set up a new custom configuration.
To select all events:
1.In the Set All Individual Events panel, select the checkbox for each notification type
to use.
2.Click Set All Individual Events.
To clear all events:
1.In the Clear All Individual Events panel, select the checkbox for each notification
type you don’t want to use.
2.Click Clear All Individual Events.
Chapter 4 Troubleshooting Using SMU 59
Enabling Service Interfaces
SMU enables the following service security options for Diagnostic Manage users
only:
Service Debug - Enables access to the Management Controller’s low-level
diagnostic shell. Enabling this option makes this interface available through
telnet at port 4048. This debug capability is limited to engineers or to storage
administrators who are working directly with engineers. Reasons to enable this
interface include:
The amount of data that needs to be gathered to debug a particular problem is
more than what fits in the debug log in RAM in the Management Controller.
A particular problem results in a power cycle so that the Management
Controller debug data (which is management RAM, not flash) is lost if not
gathered in real time.
To enable access to a service interface:
1.Select Manage > General Config > Services Security.
2.In the Network Management Services panel, enable Service Interface or Service
Debug.
3.Click Update Network Management Services.
60 HP StorageWorks 2000 Family Modular Smart Array troubleshooting guideMarch 2008
Restoring Management Controller Defaults Only
You can restore each controller's Management Controller (MC) processor to its
original manufacturer settings. In a dual-controller system, you must restore defaults
for each controller separately and then restart both controllers.
Caution - Restoring default settings replaces your current configuration changes
with the original manufacturer configuration settings. Some of these settings take
effect immediately while others take effect after you restart the controllers.
Restoring default settings cannot be cancelled or undone.
To restore MC defaults:
1.In the Restore Management Controller Defaults Only panel, click Restore MC
Defaults.
A message is displayed that specifies the main restoration steps.
2.Click OK to continue.
3.Log off this controller.
4.Log in to the partner controller.
5.Restore MC defaults.
6.Go the Restart System > Shut Down/Restart page and restart each MC.
Note - If the storage system is connected to a Microsoft Windows host, the
following event is recorded in the Windows event log: Initiator failed to connect to
the target.
7.Restart your web browser.
Chapter 4 Troubleshooting Using SMU 61
Changing Fault Isolation and PHY Settings
PHY lanes are the physical signal paths used for communication between the SAS
expander in each controller module and the drive modules in a system. The
Expander Controller in each controller module automatically monitors PHY error
(fault) rates and isolates (disables) PHYs that experience too many errors.
The Expander Isolation page is similar to the Expander Status page, but enables you
to reset expander error counters, manually disable or enable individual PHYs, and
disable or enable PHY fault isolation.
Use of the Expander Status page is described in “Checking PHY Status” on page 45
and in the reference guide.
Resetting Expander Error Counters
If PHYs have errors, you can reset expander error counters and then observe error
activity during normal operation. If a PHY continues to accumulate errors you can
disable it in the Expander Controller Phy Detail panel.
To reset expander error counters:
In the Clear Expander Errors panel, click Clear Errors.
Disabling or Enabling a PHY
To disable or enable a PHY:
In the Expander Controller Phy Detail panel, click the PHY's Disable or Enable
button.
When you disable a PHY, its button changes to Enable and its Status value changes
to DISABLED. When you enable a PHY, its button changes to Disable and its status
value changes to OK or another status.
62 HP StorageWorks 2000 Family Modular Smart Array troubleshooting guideMarch 2008
Disabling or Enabling PHY Isolation
You can change an expander’s PHY Isolation setting to enable or disable fault
monitoring and isolation for all PHYs in that expander. If Disable is shown, the
setting is enabled; if Enable is shown, the setting is disabled. This setting is enabled
by default.
To change the PHY isolation setting for expander A or expander B:
In the Phy Isolation Details panel, click the Phy Isolation field’s Disable or Enable
button.
When you disable PHY isolation, its button changes to Enable. When you enable
PHY isolation, its button changes to Disable.
Using Recovery and Debug Utilities
This section describes additional SMU troubleshooting functions that require the
user to be logged in as an Advanced Manage user.
Dequarantining a Virtual Disk
In SMU, the quarantine icon indicates that a previously fault-tolerant virtual
disk is quarantined because not all of its drives were detected after a restart or
rescan. Quarantine isolates the virtual disk from host access, and prevents the
storage system from making the virtual disk critical and starting reconstruction
when drives are “missing” for these reasons:
Slow to spin up after system power-up
Not properly seated in their slots
In an powered-off enclosure
Inserted from a different system and retain old metadata
The virtual disk can be fully recovered if the missing drives can be restored. Make
sure that no drives have been inadvertently removed and that no cables have been
unplugged. Sometimes not all drives in the virtual disk power up. Check that all
enclosures have rebooted after a power failure. If these problems are found and then
fixed, the virtual disk recovers and no data is lost.
The quarantined virtual disk’s drives are “write locked,” and the virtual disk is not
available to hosts until the virtual disk is dequarantined. The system waits
indefinitely for the missing drives. If the drives are found, the system automatically
dequarantines the virtual disk. If the drives are never found because they have been
removed or have failed, you must dequarantine the virtual disk manually.
Chapter 4 Troubleshooting Using SMU 63
If the missing drives cannot be restored (for example, a failed drive), you can use
dequarantine to restore operation in some cases. If you dequarantine a fault-tolerant
virtual disk that is not missing too many drives, its status changes to critical. Then,
if spares of the appropriate size are available, reconstruction begins.
Note - After you dequarantine the virtual disk, make sure that a spare drive is
available to let the virtual disk reconstruct.
Caution - If the virtual disk does not have enough drives to continue operation,
when a dequarantine is done, the virtual disk goes offline and its data cannot be
recovered.
To dequarantine a virtual disk:
1.Select Manage > Utilities > Recovery Utilities > Vdisk Quarantine.
For each virtual disk, the virtual disk panel shows a status icon; the name, RAID
level, size, number of disk drives, and number of volumes; and utility status, if any.
2.Select the virtual disk to dequarantine.
3.Click Dequarantine Selected Virtual Disk.
Saving Log Information to a File
You can save the following types of log information to a file:
Device status summary, which includes basic status and configuration
information for the system.
Event logs from both controllers when in active-active mode.
Debug logs from both controllers when in active-active mode.
Boot logs, which show the startup sequence for each controller.
Up to four critical error dumps from each controller. These will exist only if
critical errors have occurred.
Management Controller traces, which trace interface activity between the
controllers’ internal processors and activity on the management processor.
64 HP StorageWorks 2000 Family Modular Smart Array troubleshooting guideMarch 2008
Note - The controllers share one memory buffer for gathering log data and for
loading firmware. Do not try to perform more than one save-logs operation at a
time, or to perform a firmware-update operation while performing a save-logs
operation. Doing so will display a “buffer busy” error.
To save log information to a file:
1.Select Manage > Utilities > Debug Utilities > Save Logs To File.
2.Type contact information and comments to include in the log information file.
Contact information provides the support representatives who are reviewing the file
a means to identify who saved the log. Comments can explain why the logs are
being saved and include pertinent information about system faults.
3.Under File Contents, select the logs to include in the file.
By default, all logs are selected.
Note - Select logs judiciously. Gathering log data can be a lengthy operation,
especially if the system is performing I/O.
4.Click Generate Log Information.
When processing is complete, a summary page is displayed.
5.Review the summary of contact information, comments, and selected logs.
6.Click Download Selected Logs To File.
7.If prompted to open or save the file, click Save.
8.If prompted to specify the file location and name, do so using a .logs extension.
The default file name is store.logs. If you intend to capture multiple event logs,
be sure to name the files appropriately so that they can be identified later.
Note - If you are using Firefox and have a download directory set, the file is
automatically saved there.
Chapter 4 Troubleshooting Using SMU 65
Problems Using SMU to Access a Storage System
The following table lists problems you might encounter when using SMU to access
a storage system.
Tab le4 -1 Problems Using SMU to Access a Storage System
Problem Solution
You cannot access SMU. Verify that you entered the correct IP address.
Enter the IP address using the format
http://ip-address/index.html
If the system has two controllers, enter the IP address of the
partner controller.
SMU pages do not display
properly.
Configure your browser according to the information contained
in the reference guide.
Click Refresh or Reload in your browser to display current data
in SMU.
Be sure that someone else is not accessing the system using the
CLI. It is possible for someone else to change the system’s
configuration using the CLI. The other person’s changes might
not display in SMU until you refresh the SMU page.
If you are using Internet Explorer, clear the following option:
Tools > Internet Options > Accessibility > Ignore Colors
Specified On Webpages.
Prevent SMU pages from being cached by disabling web page
caching in your browser.
Menu options are not available. User configuration affects the SMU menu. For example,
diagnostic functions are available only to users with Diagnostic
access privileges. See the reference guide for information on
user configuration and setting access privileges.
All user profiles have been deleted
and you cannot log into SMU or
the CLI with a remote connection.
1. Use a terminal emulator (such as Microsoft HyperTerminal) to
connect to the system.
2. In the emulator, press Enter to display the serial CLI prompt
(#). No password is required because the local host is expected to
be secure.
3. Use the create user command to create new users. For
information about using the command, enter
help create user or see the CLI reference guide.
66 HP StorageWorks 2000 Family Modular Smart Array troubleshooting guideMarch 2008
Problems Scheduling Tasks
There are two parts to scheduling tasks: you must create the task and then create the
schedule to run the task.
Create the Task
There are three tasks you can create: TakeSnapshot, ResetSnapshot, and
VolumeCopy.
Make sure the syntax is correct by perform the operation directly. For example, if
you want to schedule taking a snapshot, first take a snapshot and verify that it runs.
Then create a task that will take the snapshot when scheduled.
Reset Snapshot
Before doing a reset snapshot, you must unmount the snapshot if it is connected to
a host system, or you could lose data. There is no unmount command in the CLI.
The host system must perform this task.
Schedule the Task
If your task does not run at the times you specified, check the syntax of your
schedule. It is possible to create conflicting specifications.
Start time must fall within the between times if between times is specified. The
year must be four digits, between 2006 and 2999.
Start time is the first time the task will run.
Expire date/time ends the schedule
Count also ends the schedule
Every - time based, implying time recurrence.
Every - date based, will happen at start time, again implying recurrence -
example run every day, no time specified, will run at the time specified in start
time.
Only nth - target of period, implying recurrence
Nth, must match the number. 1st, 2nd, 3rd, 4th, ..., 21st, 22nd, etc.
Chapter 4 Troubleshooting Using SMU 67
To debug schedule parameters:
1.Will the task run if you only specify a start time?
Schedule your task with only the start time. Remove all other constraints. Review
the schedule table. Look at the Next Time to run column. Does it show what you
expect?
If the task does not run, check how you created the task.
2.Add one more specification.
For example, if you want the task to run every day between 1:00 AM and 2:00 AM
add the between times. Make sure the start time is between 1:00 AM and 2:00 AM
in this example.
3.Continue adding specifications one at a time, verifying that the task runs as
scheduled.
4.Two parameters stop the schedule: expire and count. They can be conflicting
without causing an error. If you want a task to run every day until the end of the
month, and you put in a count of 10, the task runs a maximum of 10 times. If the
expire date is before the 10 times, then the task will only run until the expire date.
Resetting the Clock
Resetting the storage system clock might affect scheduled tasks. Because the
schedule begins with the start time, no schedules will run until the clock is reset. To
reset the clock in SMU, select Manage > General Config > Set Date/Time. If the
system is configured to use Network Time Protocol (NTP), and if an NRP server is
available, the system time and date is obtained from the NTP server.
Deleting Tasks
Before you can delete a task, you must delete any schedules that run the task.
68 HP StorageWorks 2000 Family Modular Smart Array troubleshooting guideMarch 2008
Errors Associated with Scheduling Tasks
The following table describes error messages associated with scheduling tasks.
Tab le4 -2 Errors Associated with Scheduling Tasks
Error Message Solution
Task Already Exists Select a different name for the task.
Task Not Found You must create a task before you can schedule it. The
task might have been deleted, but the schedule
including the task was not deleted.
Unknown Task Type There are three tasks you can create: TakeSnapshot,
ResetSnapshot and VolumeCopy.
Schedule Already Exists Select a different name for the schedule.
Expected one of START, EVERY,
BETWEEN, ONLY, COUNT, EXPIRES
There might be a comma at the end of the expression.
Invalid syntax for Nth suffix The suffix must match the number. 1st, 2nd, 3rd, etc.
69
CHAPTER5
Troubleshooting Using Event Logs
Event logs capture reported events from components throughout the storage system.
Each event consists of an event code, the date and time the event occurred, which
controller reported the event, and a description of what occurred.
This chapter includes the following topics:
“Event Severities” on page 69
“Viewing the Event Log in SMU” on page 70
“Viewing an Event Log Saved From SMU” on page71
“Reviewing Event Logs” on page 72
“Configuring the Debug Log” on page 73
“Viewing the Debug Log” on page74
Event Severities
The storage system generates events having three severity levels:
Informational - A problem occurred that the system corrected, or a system
change has been made. These events are purely informational; no action required.
Warning - Something related to the system or to a virtual disk has a problem.
Correct the problem as soon as possible.
Critical - Something related to the system or to a virtual disk has failed and
requires immediate attention.
There are a number of conditions that trigger warning or critical events and can
affect the state of status LEDs.
70 HP StorageWorks 2000 Family Modular Smart Array troubleshooting guideMarch 2008
Viewing the Event Log in SMU
You can do either of the following to display the View Event Log page:
In the System Panel on any page, click .
In the menu, select Monitor > Status > View Event Log.
In the View Event Log page, you can select which event logs you want to see.
In dual-controller mode, the options are:
Controller A & B Events - Click to show all events for both controllers. This
log appears by default.
Controller A & B Critical/Warning Events - Click to show only critical and
warning events for both controllers.
Controller A Events - Click to show events logged by controller A.
Controller B Events - Click to show events logged by controller B.
In single-controller mode, the options are:
All Controller Events - Click to show all events. This log appears by default.
Controller Critical/Warning Events - Click to show only critical and warning
events.
The page lists up to 200 events for a single controller or up to 400 events for both
controllers. The events are listed in reverse chronological order; that is, the most
recent event is at the top of the table. The following information appears:
C/W - Blank is an informational event; W is a warning event; C is a critical
event.
Date/Time - Month, day, and time when the event occurred.
EC - Event code that assists service personnel when diagnosing problems.
ESN - Event Serial Number. The prefix (A or B) indicates which controller
logged the event.
Message - Information about the event.
For example:
C/W
C
Date/Time
08-06
09:35:07
08-04
12:12:05
EC
33
65
ESN
Message
Time/date has been changed
Uncorrectable ECC error in buffer memory
address 0x0 on bootup
Chapter 5 Troubleshooting Using Event Logs 71
Viewing an Event Log Saved From SMU
You can save event log data to a file on your network by using the Save Logs To
File page, as described in the reference guide.
A saved log file has the following sections:
Contact information and comments
Combined SC event log - All events logged by both controllers.
SC event log for controller A - Events logged by controller A.
SC event log for controller B - Events logged by controller B.
SC error/warning log - Only critical and warning events for both controllers.
The file lists up to 200 events for a single controller or up to 400 events for both
controllers. The events are listed in chronological order; that is, the most recent
event is at the bottom of a section. In the event log sections, the following
information appears:
Event SN - Event Serial Number. The prefix (A or B) indicates which
controller logged the event. This corresponds to the ESN column in SMU.
Date/Time - Month, day, and time when the event occurred.
Code - Event code that assists service personnel when diagnosing problems.
This corresponds to the EC column in SMU.
Severity - Blank is an informational event; W is a warning event; C is a
critical event. This corresponds to the C/W column in SMU.
Controller - A or B indicates which controller logged the event.
Description - Information about the event. This corresponds to the Message
column in SMU.
For example:
Event SN
Date/Time
08-06 09:35:07
08-04 12:12:05
Code
33
65
Severity
I
C
Controller
A
A
Description
Time/date has been changed
Uncorrectable ECC error in
buffer memory address 0x0 on
bootup
72 HP StorageWorks 2000 Family Modular Smart Array troubleshooting guideMarch 2008
Reviewing Event Logs
When reviewing events, do the following:
1.Review the critical/warning events.
Identify the primary events and any that might be the cause of the primary event.
For example, an over temperature event could cause a drive failure.
2.Review the event log for the controller that reported the critical/warning event by
viewing the event log by controller. Locate the critical/warning events in the
sequence.
Repeat this step for the other controller if necessary.
3.Review the events that occurred before and after the primary event.
During this review you are looking for any events that might indicate the cause of
the critical/warning event. You are also looking for events that resulted from the
critical/warning event, known as secondary events.
4.Review the events following the primary and secondary events.
You are looking for any actions that might have already been taken to resolve the
problems reported by the events.
Chapter 5 Troubleshooting Using Event Logs 73
Configuring the Debug Log
When instructed to do so by service personnel, as an Advanced Manage user you
can configure the debug log. The debug log captures data that will help engineering
locate problems within the system logic.
After you configure the debug log as instructed, you will need to perform I/O to the
system or re-create the situation that is causing the fault. This populates the debug
log with information that engineering can use to diagnose the system.
Note - The debug log only collects data after you configure it. It will not contain
information about any problems that occurred before you configure it.
To configure the debug log:
1.Select Manage > Utilities > Debug Utilities > Debug Log Setup.
The Debug Log Setup page is displayed.
2.Select the debug log setup you want.
Standard - Used for diagnosing general problems. With minimal impact on I/O
performance, it collects a wide range of debug data.
Fibre Channel Performance - Used for diagnosing Fibre Channel problems. This
option dedicates the debug log to collecting Fibre Channel data, with minimal
impact on I/O performance.
Device-Side - Used for diagnosing device-side problems. This option collects
device failure data and Fibre Channel data, with minimal impact on I/O
performance.
Device Management - Collects very verbose information, including all
Configuration API (CAPI) transactions. Because this option collects a lot of data,
it has a substantial impact on performance and quickly fills up the debug trace.
Custom Debug Tracing - Shows that specific events are selected for inclusion in
the log. This is the default. If no events are selected, this option is not displayed.
3.Click Change Debug Logging Setup.
4.If instructed by service personnel, click Advanced Debug Logging Setup Options
and select one or more additional types of events.
Under normal conditions, none of these options should be selected because they
have a slight impact on read/write performance.
74 HP StorageWorks 2000 Family Modular Smart Array troubleshooting guideMarch 2008
Viewing the Debug Log
As a Diagnostic Manage user, you can set debug log display options on the View
Debug Log page and then generate and view log entries. The type of data included
in the log is configured on the Debug Log Setup page (see “Configuring the Debug
Log” on page 73). Each log entry includes a time stamp and a message.
To view the debug log:
1.Select Manage > Utilities > Debug Utilities > View Debug Log.
2.Set the number of lines to display.
The default is 400.
3.Select the controller to display debug lines from.
The default is controller A.
4.Click Load/Reload Debug Log.
The Debug Log Timestamp value is updated to show when the log was generated,
and the log data is displayed.
75
CHAPTER6
Voltage and Temperature Warnings
The storage system provides voltage and temperature warnings, which are generally
input or environmental conditions. Voltage warnings can occur if the input voltage
is too low or if a FRU is receiving too little or too much power from the power-and-
cooling module. Temperature warnings are generally the result of a fan failure, a
FRU being removed from an enclosure for a lengthy time period, or a high ambient
temperature around an enclosure.
This chapter describes the steps to take to resolve voltage and temperature warnings
and provides information about the power supply, cooling fan, temperature, and
voltage sensor locations and alarm conditions. Topics covered in this chapter
include:
“Resolving Voltage and Temperature Warnings” on page 75
“Sensor Locations” on page 76
Resolving Voltage and Temperature Warnings
To resolve voltage and temperature warnings:
1.Check that all of the fans are working by making sure each power-and-cooling
module’s DC Voltage/Fan Fault/Service Required LED is off or by using the SMU
Status Summary page (see “Correcting Enclosure IDs” on page 35).
2.Make sure that all modules are fully seated in their slots and that their latches are
locked.
3.Make sure that no slots are left open for more than two minutes.
If you need to replace a module, leave the old module in place until you have the
replacement or use a blank module to fill the slot. Leaving a slot open negatively
affects the airflow and can cause the enclosure to overheat.
4.Try replacing each power-and-cooling module one at a time.
5.Replace the controller modules, one at a time.
76 HP StorageWorks 2000 Family Modular Smart Array troubleshooting guideMarch 2008
Sensor Locations
The storage system monitors conditions at different points within each enclosure to
alert you to problems. Power, cooling fan, temperature, and voltage sensors are
located at key points in the enclosure. In the SAS expander in each controller
module and expansion module, the enclosure management processor (EMP)
monitors the status of these sensors to perform SCSI enclosure services (SES)
functions. Various SMU pages display the sensor information, for example Monitor
> Status > Module Status.
The following sections describe each element and its sensors.
Power Supply Sensors
As shown in Figure 6-1, each enclosure has two fully redundant power-and-cooling
modules with load-sharing capabilities. The power supply sensors described in the
following table monitor the voltage, temperature, and fans in each power-and-
cooling module. If the power supply sensors report a voltage that is under or over
the threshold, check the input voltage.
Tab le6 -1 Power Supply Sensors
Description Location Alarm Conditions
Power supply 1 Power-and-cooling module 0 Voltage, temperature, or fan fault
Power supply 2 Power-and-cooling module 1 Voltage, temperature, or fan fault
Chapter 6 Voltage and Temperature Warnings 77
Figure 6-1 Power-and-Cooling Module and Cooling Fan Locations
Cooling Fan Sensors
As shown in Figure 6-1, each power-and-cooling module includes two fans. The
normal range for fan speed is 4000 to 6000 RPM. When a fan’s speed drops below
4000 RPM, the EMP considers it a failure and posts an alarm in the storage system’s
event log. The following table lists the description, location, and alarm condition for
each fan. If the fan speed remains under the 4000 RPM threshold, the internal
enclosure temperature may continue to rise. Replace the power-and-cooling module
reporting the fault.
During a shutdown, the cooling fans do not shut off. This allows the enclosure to
continue cooling.
Tab le6 -2 Cooling Fan Sensor Descriptions
Description Location Alarm Condition
Fan 0 Power-and-cooling module 0 < 4000 RPM
Fan 1 Power-and-cooling module 0 < 4000 RPM
Fan 2 Power-and-cooling module 1 < 4000 RPM
Fan 3 Power-and-cooling module 1 < 4000 RPM
Power-and-cooling
module 1
Power-and-cooling
Fan 0
Fan 1
Fan 3
Fan 2
module 0
78 HP StorageWorks 2000 Family Modular Smart Array troubleshooting guideMarch 2008
Temperature Sensors
Extreme high and low temperatures can cause significant damage if they go
unnoticed. Each controller module has six temperature sensors. Of these, if the CPU
or FPGA temperature reaches a shutdown value, the controller module is
automatically shut down. Each power-and-cooling module has one temperature
sensor.
When a temperature fault is reported, it must be remedied as quickly as possible to
avoid system damage. This can be done by warming or cooling the installation
location.
Tab le6 -3 Controller Module Temperature Sensors
Description
Normal
Operating
Range
Warning
Operating
Range
Critical
Operating
Range
Shutdown
Values
CPU Temperature 3-92°C 0-3°C,
92-95°C
> 95°C0°C
105°C
FPGA Temperature 3-92°C 0-3°C,
92-95°C
0°C
95°C
Onboard Temperature 1
Onboard Temperature 2
Capacitor Temperature 0-70°C
CM Temperature
Tab le6 -4 Power-and-Cooling Module Temperature Sensors
Description
Normal
Operating
Range
Warning
Operating
Range
Critical
Operating
Range
Shutdown
Values
Power Supply 1 Temperature
(power-and-cooling module 0)
0-80°C
Power Supply 2 Temperature
(power-and-cooling module 0)
0-80°C
Chapter 6 Voltage and Temperature Warnings 79
To view the controller enclosure’s temperature status, in SMU, as an Advanced
Manage user:
Select Monitor > Status > Advanced Settings > Temperature Status.
For more information see SMU help or the reference guide.
Power-and-Cooling Module Voltage Sensors
Power supply voltage sensors ensure that an enclosure’s power supply voltage is
within normal ranges. There are three voltage sensors per power-and-cooling
module.
Tab le6 -5 Voltage Sensor Descriptions
Sensor Alarm Conditions
Power Supply 1 Voltage, 12V < 11.00V
> 13.00V
Power Supply 1 Voltage, 5V < 4.00V
> 6.00V
Power Supply 1 Voltage, 3.3V < 3.00V
> 3.80V
80 HP StorageWorks 2000 Family Modular Smart Array troubleshooting guideMarch 2008
81
CHAPTER7
Troubleshooting and Replacing FRUs
This chapter describes how to troubleshoot and replace field-replaceable units. A
field-replaceable unit (FRU) is a system component that is designed to be replaced
onsite.
This chapter contains the following sections:
“Available FRUs” on page 82
“Static Electricity Precautions” on page 84
“Identifying Controller or Expansion Module Faults” on page 84
“Removing and Replacing a Controller or Expansion Module” on page 86
“Updating Firmware” on page93
“Identifying SFP Module Faults on A Fibre Channel Storage System” on page 95
“Removing and Replacing an SFP Module on a Fibre Channel Storage System”
on page 96
“Identifying Cable Faults” on page 97
“Identifying Drive Module Faults” on page 98
“Removing and Replacing a Drive Module” on page 104
“Identifying Virtual Disk Faults” on page112
“Identifying Power-and-Cooling Module Faults” on page 114
“Removing and Replacing a Power-and-Cooling Module” on page 115
“Replacing an Enclosure” on page 117
82 HP StorageWorks 2000 Family Modular Smart Array troubleshooting guideMarch 2008
Available FRUs
Table7-1 lists available FRUs for your storage system.
Tab le7 -1 Available FRUs
FRU Description Part Number
HP 2012fc SC Modular Smart Array AJ742A
HP 2012fc DC Modular Smart Array AJ743A
HP 2000fc DC Modular Smart Array Controller AJ744A
HP 2212fc DC Enh Modular Smart Array AJ745A
HP 2012i SC Modular Smart Array AJ746A
HP 2012i DC Modular Smart Array AJ747A
HP 2000i Modular Smart Array Controller AJ748A
HP MSA2000 3.5in Sngl I/O 12 Drive Encl AJ749A
HP MSA2000 3.5in Dual I/O 12 Drive Encl AJ750A
HP MSA2000 Drive Enclosure I/O Module AJ751A
HP MSA2 146GB 15K rpm 3.5 inch SAS HDD AJ735A
HP MSA2 300GB 15K rpm 3.5 inch SAS HDD AJ736A
HP MSA2 400GB 10K rpm 3.5 inch SAS HDD AJ737A
HP MSA2 500GB 7.2K rpm 3.5 inch SATA HDD AJ738A
HP MSA2 750GB 7.2K rpm 3.5 inch SATA HDD AJ739A
HP MSA2 1TB 7.2K rpm 3.5 inch SATA HDD AJ740A
SPS-DRV,HD 146GB MSA2 3.5” 15K DP SAS 480937-001
SPS-DRV,HD 300GB MSA2 3.5” 15K DP SAS 480938-001
SPS-DRV,HD 400GB MSA2 3.5” 10K DP SAS 480939-001
SPS-DRV,HD 500GB MSA2 3.5” 7.2K SATA 480940-001
SPS-DRV,HD 750GB MSA2 3.5” 7.2K SATA 480941-001
SPS-DRV,HD 1TB MSA2 3.5” 7.2K SATA 480942-001
SPS-Power Supply 481320-001
Chapter 7 Troubleshooting and Replacing FRUs 83
SPS-Chassis with midplane 481321-001
SPS-Controller,FC 481319-001
SPS-Controller, Mod, Enhanced 481341-001
SPS-Controller, iSCSI 481340-001
SPS-Enclosure, I/O Module 481342-001
SPS-Cable Kit 481322-001
SPS-Blank, Cntrl 481343-001
SPS-Blank, HDD 481344-001
SPS-SFP, XCVR 481345-001
Tab le7 -1 Available FRUs (Continued)
FRU Description Part Number
84 HP StorageWorks 2000 Family Modular Smart Array troubleshooting guideMarch 2008
Static Electricity Precautions
To prevent damaging a FRU, make sure you follow these static electricity
precautions:
Remove plastic, vinyl, and foam from the work area.
Wear an antistatic wrist strap, attached to a ground.
Before handling a FRU, discharge any static electricity by touching a ground
surface.
Do not remove a FRU from its antistatic protective bag until you are ready to
install it.
When removing a FRU from a controller enclosure, immediately place the FRU
in an antistatic bag and in antistatic packaging.
Handle a FRU only by its edges and avoid touching the circuitry.
Do not slide a FRU over any surface.
Limit body movement (which builds up static electricity) during FRU
installation.
Identifying Controller or Expansion Module Faults
The controller and expansion modules contain subcomponents that require the
replacement of the entire FRU should they fail. Each controller and expansion
module contains LEDs that can be used to identify a fault. Additionally, you can use
SMU to locate and isolate controller and expansion module faults. See
“Troubleshooting Using SMU” on page 35.
Note - When troubleshooting, ensure that you review the reported events carefully.
The controller module is often the FRU reporting faults, but is not always the FRU
where the fault is occurring.
Chapter 7 Troubleshooting and Replacing FRUs 85
Table 7-2 lists the faults you might encounter with a controller module or expansion
module.
Tab le7 -2 Controller Module or Expansion Module Faults
Problem Solution
OK LED is off Verify that the controller module is properly seated in the slot and
latched.
Check the SMU event log for power-on initialization events and
diagnostic errors.
Fault/Service Required LED is
on
Examine the event log to determine if there is any error event and
take appropriate action.
Call technical support and send in the log and event files.
Replace the controller that displayed the fault LED.
Only one controller module
boots
In a dual controller module configuration, if a conflict between
controllers exists, only controller module A will boot. For example,
if the cache size is different on the controller modules, controller
module B will not boot.
An SDRAM memory error is
reported
Replace the controller module where the error occurred.
Controller Failure
Event codes 84 and 74
The controller might need to have its firmware upgraded or be
replaced.
Check the specific error code to determine the corrective action to
take.
Controller voltage fault Check the power-and-cooling module and the input voltage.
Controller temperature fault Check that the enclosure fans are running.
Check that the ambient temperature is not too warm.
The enclosure operating range is 41°F to 104°F (5°C to
40°C)
Check for any obstructions to the airflow.
When the problem is fixed, event 47 is logged.
86 HP StorageWorks 2000 Family Modular Smart Array troubleshooting guideMarch 2008
Removing and Replacing a Controller or Expansion
Module
In a dual-controller configuration, controller and expansion modules are hot-
swappable, which means you can replace one module without halting I/O to the
storage system or powering it off. In this case, the second module takes over
operation of the storage system until you install the new module.
In a single-controller configuration, I/O to the storage system must be halted and the
storage system must be powered off.
A controller or expansion module might need replacing when:
The Fault/Service Required LED is illuminated
Events in SMU indicate a problem with the module
Troubleshooting indicates a problem with the module
The internal clock battery fails
Caution - In a dual-controller configuration, both controllers must have the same
cache size. If the new controller has a different cache size, controller A will boot
and controller B will not boot. To view the cache size, select Monitor > Advanced
Settings > Controller Versions.
Memory Error
Event code 65 and 138
Contact Technical Support.
The controller module needs to be replaced.
Event 72 indicates that, after the failover to the other controller, the
recovery has started.
Flash write failure
Event code 157
The controller needs to be replaced.
Firmware mismatch
Event code 89
The downlevel controller needs to be upgraded.
Tab le7 -2 Controller Module or Expansion Module Faults (Continued)
Problem Solution
Chapter 7 Troubleshooting and Replacing FRUs 87
Saving Configuration Settings
Before replacing a controller module, save the storage system’s configuration
settings to file. This enables you to make a backup of your settings in case a
subsequent configuration change causes a problem, or if you want to apply one
system’s settings to another system.
The file contains all system configuration data, including:
LAN configuration settings
Host port configuration settings
Enclosure management settings
Disk configuration settings
Services security settings
System information settings
System preference settings
Event notification settings
The configuration file does not include configuration data for virtual disks and
volumes. You do not need to save this data before replacing a controller or
expansion module because the data is saved as metadata in the first sectors of
associated disk drives
To save system configuration data to a file on the management host or network:
1.In SMU, connect to the IP address of one of the controller modules.
2.Select Manage > Utilities > Configuration Utilities > Save Config File.
3.Click Save Configuration File.
4.If prompted to open or save the file, click Save.
5.If prompted to specify the file location and name, do so, optionally using a
.config extension.
The default file name is saved_config.config.
Note - If you are using Firefox and have a download directory set, the file is
automatically saved there.
88 HP StorageWorks 2000 Family Modular Smart Array troubleshooting guideMarch 2008
Shutting Down a Controller Module
Shut down a controller module before you remove it from an enclosure, or before
you power off its enclosure for maintenance, repair, or a move. Shutting down a
controller module halts I/O to that module, ensures that any data in the write cache
is written to disk, and initiates failover to the partner controller, if it is active.
Caution - In a dual-controller configuration, while both controllers are shut down,
you have limited management capability for the storage system and host
applications do not have access to its volumes. If you want the system to remain
available, before shutting down one controller verify that the other controller is
active.
To shut down a controller module:
1.Select Manage > Restart System > Shut Down/Restart.
2.In the Shut Down panel, select a controller option.
3.Click Shut Down.
A warning might appear that data access redundancy will be lost until the selected
controller is restarted. This is an informational message that requires no action.
4.Confirm the operation by clicking OK.
Note - If the storage system is connected to a Microsoft Windows host, the
following event is recorded in the Windows event log: Initiator failed to connect to
the target.
Chapter 7 Troubleshooting and Replacing FRUs 89
Removing a Controller Module or Expansion
Module
In a dual-controller configuration, as long as the other module in the enclosure you
are removing remains online and active, you can remove a module without
powering down the enclosure; however you must shut down a controller module as
described in “Shutting Down a Controller Module” on page 88.
Caution - When you remove a module with the enclosure powered on, within two
minutes install a replacement module or a blank; otherwise, the enclosure might
overheat.
To remove a controller module or expansion module:
1.Follow all static electricity precautions as described in “Static Electricity
Precautions” on page 84.
2.Use SMU to check the status of the partner module.
To ensure continuous availability of the system, be sure that the partner module is
online. If the partner is offline, resolve the problem with that module before
continuing this procedure.
3.If you are removing a controller module and the partner module is online, use SMU
to shut down the module that you want to remove; see “Shutting Down a Controller
Module” on page 88.
You need to use the Shut Down function for controller modules only. The blue OK
to Remove LED illuminates to indicate that the module can be removed safely.
4.Use SMU to illuminate the UID (Unit Identification) LED of the enclosure that
contains the module to remove:
a.Select Manage > General Config > Enclosure Management.
b. Click Illuminate Locator LED.
5.Locate the enclosure whose UID LED is solid blue, and within it, the module whose
OK to Remove LED is blue.
6.Disconnect any SAS cables that connect the controller to a drive enclosure.
90 HP StorageWorks 2000 Family Modular Smart Array troubleshooting guideMarch 2008
7.Turn the thumbscrews (see Figure 7-1) until the screws disengages from the
controller.
Figure 7-1 Location of Thumbscrews on Controller Module Latches
8.Press both latches downward (see Figure 7-2) to disconnect the module from the
midplane.
Figure 7-2 Disconnecting Module From the Midplane
9.Pull outward on the latches to slide the module out of the enclosure.
ThumbscrewLatch
Thumbscrew
Latch
Chapter 7 Troubleshooting and Replacing FRUs 91
Installing a Controller Module or Expansion
Module
You can install a controller module or expansion module into an enclosure that is
powered on.
Caution - When replacing a controller module, ensure that less than 10 seconds
elapse between inserting the module into a slot and fully latching it in place. Failing
to do so might cause the controller to fail. If it is not latched within 10 seconds,
remove the module from the slot and repeat the process.
To install a controller module or an expansion module:
1.Follow all static electricity precautions as described in “Static Electricity
Precautions” on page 84.
2.Loosen the thumbscrews; press the latches downward. See Figure 7-1 and
Figure7-2.
3.Press the latches upward to engage the module; turn the thumbscrews finger-tight.
Figure 7-3 Inserting an I/O Module.
92 HP StorageWorks 2000 Family Modular Smart Array troubleshooting guideMarch 2008
The module begins initializing.
Note - In a dual-controller configuration, if partner firmware update is enabled, and
the firmware versions differ on the two modules, the module with the older
firmware will update itself with the newer firmware from the other controller.
The OK LED illuminates green when the module completes initializing and is
online.
4.Reconnect the SAS cables.
5.If the enclosure’s UID is on, use SMU to turn it off:
a.Select Manage > General Config > Enclosure Management.
b. Click Turn Off Locator LED.
Fault/Service Required
If the Fault/Service Required amber LED is illuminated, the module has not gone
online and likely failed its self-test. Try to put the module online (see “Shutting
Down a Controller Module” on page 88) or check for errors that were generated in
the event log from SMU.
Boot Handshake Error
When powering on the controllers, if SMU or the event log report a boot handshake
error, power off the enclosure for two seconds and then power it on again. If this
does not correct the error, remove and replace each controller as described in
“Removing a Controller Module or Expansion Module” on page 89.
Setting the Internal Clock
The clock battery is not a FRU. You must send in the controller module for service
to have the battery replaced.
When the serviced controller module is reinserted into the enclosure, the
controller’s date and time are automatically updated to match the date and time of
the partner controller.
In a single controller configuration, you must set the clock manually. To set the date
and time in SMU, select Manage > General Config > Set Date/Time.
Chapter 7 Troubleshooting and Replacing FRUs 93
Persistent IP Address
The IP address for each controller is stored in a SEEPROM on the midplane. The IP
address is persistent. When you replace a controller, the new controller will have the
same IP address as the old controller.
Moving a Set of Expansion Modules
The enclosure ID for the RAID controller is always zero. The expansion modules
are then numbered from one to four. The number is visible on the front on the
enclosure. If you move a single expansion module, or a set of expansion modules to
another controller and reconnect them in a different order, an error will occur. The
enclosure ID is not updated. Always move a complete set of expansion modules and
connect them in the same order as they were connected to the original controller
module.
Updating Firmware
Occasionally new firmware is released to provide new features and fixes to known
issues. The firmware is updated during controller replacement or by using SMU.
Caution - Do not power off the storage system during a firmware upgrade. Doing
so might cause irreparable damage to the controllers.
Updating Firmware During Controller
Replacement
When a replacement controller is sent from the factory, it might have a more recent
version of firmware installed than the surviving controller in your system. By
default, when you insert the replacement controller, the system compares the
firmware of the existing controller and that of the new controller. The controller
with the oldest firmware automatically downloads the firmware from the controller
with the most recent firmware (partner firmware upgrade). If told to do so by a
service technician, you can disable the partner firmware upgrade function using
SMU.
94 HP StorageWorks 2000 Family Modular Smart Array troubleshooting guideMarch 2008
Disabling Partner Firmware Upgrade
The partner firmware upgrade option is enabled by default in SMU. Only disable
this function if told to do so by a service technician.
1.Select Manage > General Config > System Configuration.
2.For Partner Firmware Upgrade, select Disable.
Updating Firmware Using SMU
SMU enables you to upgrade the firmware in your storage system when new
releases are available.
Note - The controllers share one memory buffer for gathering log data and for
loading firmware. Do not try to perform more than one firmware-update operation
at a time, or to perform a firmware-update operation while performing a save-logs
operation. Doing so will display a “buffer busy” error.
To update your firmware using SMU, perform the following steps:
1.Ensure that the software package file is saved to a location on your network that the
storage system can access.
2.Select Manage > Update Software > Controller Software.
The Load Software panel is displayed, which describes the update process and lists
your current software versions.
3.Click Browse and select the software package file.
4.Click Load Software Package File.
If the storage system finds a problem with the file, it shows a message at the top of
the page. To resolve the problem, try the following:
Chapter 7 Troubleshooting and Replacing FRUs 95
Be sure to select the software package file that you just downloaded.
Download the file again, in case it got corrupted. Do not attempt to edit the file.
After about 30 seconds, the Load Software to Controller Module panel is displayed.
This page lets you know whether the file was validated and what software
components are in the file. The storage system only updates the software that has
changes.
5.Review the current and new software versions, and then click Proceed with Code
Update.
A Code Load Progress window is displayed to show the progress of the update,
which can take several minutes to complete. Do not power off the storage system
during the code load process. Once the firmware upload is complete, the controller
resets after which the opposite controller automatically repeats the process to load
the new firmware. When the update completes on the connected controller, you are
logged out. Wait one minute for the controller to start and click Log In to reconnect
to SMU.
Identifying SFP Module Faults on A Fibre Channel
Storage System
The FC controller enclosure uses small form-factor pluggable (SFP) transceivers to
attach the enclosure to Fibre Channel data hosts. Because SFPs are part of the data
bus that consists of the SFP, a cable, another SFP, and an HBA, when a fault is
reported, it can be caused by any component of the data bus.
Note - SFPs that have been dropped can be damaged. Problems resulting from a
dropped SFP include intermittent errors and no link.
To identify a faulty SFP, utilize the link LED and perform the troubleshooting
procedure described in “Using Controller Module Host Port LEDs” on page 27.
96 HP StorageWorks 2000 Family Modular Smart Array troubleshooting guideMarch 2008
Removing and Replacing an SFP Module on a Fibre
Channel Storage System
This section provides steps to remove and replace and SFP module.
Removing an SFP Module
To remove and SFP module, perform the following steps:
1.Disconnect the fiber-optic interface cable by pushing on the tab on the cable to
release it from the SFP.
If removing more than one cable, make sure that they are labeled before removing
them. The cables are fragile; use care when handling them.
To prevent possible loss of access to data, be sure to remove the correct cable and
SFP.
Caution - Mishandling fiber-optic cables can degrade performance. Do not twist,
fold, pinch, or step on fiber-optic cables. Do not bend the fiber-optic cables tighter
than a 2-inch radius.
2.The SFP is held in place by a small wire bail actuator; flip the actuator up and
gently pull on it to remove the SFP from the controller.
Installing an SFP Module
To install an SFP module, perform the following steps:
1.If the SFP has a plug, remove it, and slide the SFP into the port until it locks into
place.
2.Connect the fiber-optic interface cable into the duplex jack at the end of the SFP.
Chapter 7 Troubleshooting and Replacing FRUs 97
Identifying Cable Faults
When identifying cable faults you must remember that there are two sides of the
controller: the input/output to the host and the input/output to the drive enclosures.
It is also important to remember that identifying a cable fault can be difficult due to
the multiple components that make up the data paths that cannot be overlooked as a
cause of the fault.
Before you take to many troubleshooting steps, ensure you have reviewed the
proper cabling steps in the user guide. Many faults can be eliminated by properly
cabling the storage system.
Identifying Cable Faults on the Host Side
To identify a faulty cable on the host side, use the host link status LED and perform
the troubleshooting procedure described in “Using Controller Module Host Port
LEDs” on page 27.
Identifying Cable Faults on the Drive Enclosure
Side
To identify a cable fault on the drive enclosure side, perform the troubleshooting
procedure described in “Using Expansion Module LEDs” on page 33.
Disconnecting and Reconnecting SAS Cables
The storage system supports disconnecting and reconnecting SAS cables between
enclosures while the system is active. You might need to do this as part of replacing
an I/O module.
The guidelines are as follows:
If less than 15 seconds elapses between disconnecting and reconnecting a cable
to the same port, no further action is required.
If less than 15 seconds elapses between when disconnecting a cable and
connecting it to a different port in the same enclosure or in a different enclosure,
you must perform a manual rescan. In SMU, select Manage > Utilities > Disk
Drive Utilities > Rescan.
98 HP StorageWorks 2000 Family Modular Smart Array troubleshooting guideMarch 2008
If at least 15 seconds elapses between disconnecting a cable and connecting it to
a different port in the same enclosure or in a different enclosure, no further action
is required.
Identifying Drive Module Faults
When identifying faults in drive modules you must:
Understand disk-related errors
Be able to determine if the error is due to a faulty disk drive or faulty disk drive
channel
Identify what action the controller has taken to protect the virtual disk after the
drive fault occurred (that is, rebuilding to a hot-spare)
Know how to identify disk drives in the enclosure
Understand the proper procedure for replacing a faulty drive module
Chapter 7 Troubleshooting and Replacing FRUs 99
Understanding Disk-Related Errors
The event log includes errors reported by the enclosure management processors
(EMPs) and disk drives in your storage system. If you see these errors in the event
log, the following information will help you understand the errors.
When a disk detects an error, it reports it to the controller by returning a SCSI sense
key, and if appropriate, additional information. This information is recorded in the
SMU event log. Table7-3 lists some of the most common SCSI sense key
descriptions (in hexadecimal). Table 7-4 lists the descriptions for the standard SCSI
sense codes (ASC) and sense code qualifiers (ASCQ), all in hexadecimal. See the
SCSI Primary Commands - 2 (SPC-2) Specification for a complete list of ASC and
ASCQ descriptions.
Tab le7 -3 Standard SCSI Sense Key Descriptions
Sense Key Description
0h No sense
1h Recovered error
2h Not ready
3h Medium error
4h Hardware error
5h Illegal request
6h Unit attention
7h Data protect
8h Blank check
9h Vendor-specific
Ah Copy aborted
Bh Aborted command
Ch Obsolete
Dh Volume overflow
Eh Miscompare
Fh Reserved
100 HP StorageWorks 2000 Family Modular Smart Array troubleshooting guideMarch 2008
Disk Drive Errors
In general media errors (sense key 3), recovery errors (sense key 1), and SMART
events (identified by the following text in the event logs: “SMART event”) clearly
point to a problem with a specific drive. Other events, such as protocol errors and
I/O timeouts might suggest drive problems, but also might be indicative of poorly
seated or faulty cables, or problems with particular drive slots. Each of these events
may result in a warning or critical notification in SMU and the event log.
Tab le7 -4 Common ASC and ASCQ Descriptions
ASC ASCQ Descriptions
0C 02 Write error - auto-reallocation failed
0C 03 Write error - recommend reassignment
11 00 Unrecovered read error
11 01 Read retries exhausted
11 02 Error too long to correct
11 03 Multiple read errors
11 04 Unrecovered read error - auto-reallocation failed
11 0B Unrecovered read error - recommend reassignment
11 0C Unrecovered read error - recommend rewrite the data
47 01h Data phase CRC error detected
Chapter 7 Troubleshooting and Replacing FRUs 101
Disk Channel Errors
Disk channel errors are similar to disk-detected errors, except they are detected by
the controllers instead of the disk drive. Some disk channel errors are displayed as
text strings. Others are displayed as hexadecimal codes.
If the error is a critical error, perform the steps in “Disk Drive Errors” on page 100.
Table 7-5 lists the descriptions for disk channel errors. Most disk channel errors are
informational because the storage system issues retries to correct any problem.
Errors that cannot be corrected with retries result in another critical event describing
the affected array (if any).
Tab le7 -5 Disk Channel Error Codes
Error Code Description
CRC Error CRC error on data was received from a target.
Dev Busy Target reported busy status.
Dn/Ov Run Data overrun or underrun has been detected.
IOTimeout Array aborted an I/O request to this target because it timed out.
Link Down Link down while communication in progress.
LIP I/O request was aborted because of a channel reset.
No Respon No response from target.
Port Fail Disk channel hardware failure. This may be the result of bad cabling.
PrtcolError Array detected an unrecoverable protocol error on the part of the target.
QueueFull Target reported queue full status.
Stat: 04 Data overrun or underrun occurred while getting sense data.
Stat: 05 Request for sense data failed.
Stat: 32 Target has been reserved by another initiator.
Stat: 42 I/O request was aborted because of array’s decision to reset the channel.
Stat: 44 Array decided to abort I/O request for reasons other than bus or target
reset.
Stat: 45 I/O request was aborted because of target reset requested by array.
Stat: 46 Target did not respond properly to abort sequence.
102 HP StorageWorks 2000 Family Modular Smart Array troubleshooting guideMarch 2008
Identifying Faulty Drive Modules
To identify faulty drive modules, perform the following steps:
1.Does the fault involve a single drive?
If yes, perform steps Step 2 through Step 4.
If an entire enclosure of disk drives are faulty check your cabling and if
necessary perform the steps in “Identifying Cable Faults” on page 97.
2.Identify the suspected faulty disk drive using the LEDs.
3.Replace the suspected faulty disk drive with a known good drive (a replacement
drive).
4.Does this correct the fault?
If yes, the fault has been corrected and no further action is necessary.
If no, continue to Step 5.
5.The fault may be caused by a bad disk drive slot on the midplane. Confirm your
findings by powering off the storage system, moving an operating disk drive into
the suspected slot, and re-applying power.
Note - Step 5 requires that you schedule down time for the system.
6.Does this drive fail when placed in the suspected slot?
Yes, replace the enclosure. You have located the faulty FRU.
No, continue to Step 7.
7.If it does not fail, move the drive back to it original slot and ensure the replacement
drive is fully inserted into the slot.
If the drive fails again the midplane may have an intermittent fault or the connector
is dirty, replace the enclosure.
Chapter 7 Troubleshooting and Replacing FRUs 103
Updating Disk Drive Firmware
Note - To update a disk drive’s firmware, the disk cannot be part of a virtual disk.
The update procedure might work; however, the disk drive manufactures will not
guarantee the integrity of the data on the disk.
If the disk drives do not have the latest firmware, update the firmware. You can
determine the firmware revision level by selecting
Manage > Update Software > Disk Drive Firmware >Show Disk Drive Types.
1.Back up all data on the virtual disk.
2.Remove the disk from the virtual disk. You can also delete the virtual disk and
recreate it after the upgrade procedure if all the disks need to have their firmware
updated. To see what virtual disk the disk drive in a part of, select
Monitor > Status > Enclosure View and move the mouse over the disk drives.
3.Select Manage > Update Software > Disk Drive Firmware > Update Firmware.
4.Select the type of disk drives to be updated.
5.Select the specific disk drives to be updated.
If you select a drive that is part of a virtual disk, a warning message is displayed.
6.Select the location where the disk drive firmware is located and click Load Device
Firmware.
Disk drive firmware is available from the disk drive manufacturer, or your storage
system vendor.
7.For the Maxtor disk drives, restart controller B.
Note - If the storage system is connected to a Microsoft Windows host, the
following event is recorded in the Windows event log: Initiator failed to connect to
the target.
8.Verify that the disk drives are at the new firmware revisions level by selecting
Manage > Update Software > Disk Drive Firmware > Show Disk Drive Types.
104 HP StorageWorks 2000 Family Modular Smart Array troubleshooting guideMarch 2008
Removing and Replacing a Drive Module
A drive module consists of a disk drive in a sled. Drive modules are hot-swappable,
which means they can be replaced without halting I/O to the storage system or
powering it off.
Caution - To prevent any possibility of data loss, back up data to another virtual
disk or other location before removing the drive module.
Caution - When you replace a drive module, the new module must be the same
type (SAS or SATA) and must have a capacity equal to or greater than the drive
module you are replacing. Otherwise the storage system will not accept the new
disk drive for the virtual disk.
If you are using disk management software or volume management software to
manage your disk storage, you might need to perform software operations to take a
drive module offline before you remove it and then, after you have replaced it, to
bring the new drive module online. See the documentation that accompanies your
disk management software or volume management software for more information.
Chapter 7 Troubleshooting and Replacing FRUs 105
Replacing a Drive Module When the Virtual Disk
Is Rebuilding
When a drive module fails or is removed, the system rebuilds the virtual disk by
restoring any data that was on the failed disk drive onto a global spare or virtual
disk spare, if one is available. If you replace more than one drive module at a time,
the virtual disk cannot be rebuilt. If more than one drive module fails in a virtual
disk (except RAID 6 and 10), the virtual disk fails and data from the virtual disk is
lost.
When you want to replace a drive module and a virtual disk to which it belongs is
being rebuilt, you have two options:
Wait until the rebuild process is completed, and then replace the defective drive
module. The benefit is that the virtual disk is fully restored before you replace
the defective drive. This eliminates the possibility of lost data if the wrong drive
is removed.
Replace the defective drive and make the new drive a global spare while the
rebuilding process continues. This procedure installs the new drive and assigns it
as a global spare so that an automatic rebuild can occur if a drive module fails on
another virtual disk.
If a drive module fails in another virtual disk before a new global spare is
assigned, you must manually rebuild the virtual disk.
106 HP StorageWorks 2000 Family Modular Smart Array troubleshooting guideMarch 2008
Identifying the Location of a Faulty Drive Module
Before replacing a drive module, perform the following steps to ensure that you
have identified the correct drive module for removal.
Caution - Failure to identify the correct drive module might result in data loss
from removing the wrong drive.
1.When a disk drive fault occurs, the failed disk drive’s upper LED is solid amber,
indicating that it must be replaced; locate the amber LED at the front of the drive
module.
2.To verify the faulty drive module from SMU, select Monitor > Status > Status
Summary.
3.In the Virtual Disk Overview panel, locate and click any critical virtual disks .
The Virtual Disk Status panel is displayed. As shown in Figure 7-4, the Virtual Disk
Drive List panel shows the status of the faulty drive as Down.
Figure 7-4 Virtual Disk Drive List Panel
4.Replace the failed module by following the instructions in “Removing a Drive
Module” on page 107.
You can also use the CLI show enclosure-status command. If the drive status
is “Absent” the drive might have failed, or it has been removed from the chassis.
For details on the show enclosure-status command, see the CLI reference
guide.
Chapter 7 Troubleshooting and Replacing FRUs 107
Removing a Drive Module
When you remove a drive module, it is important to maintain optimum airflow
through the chassis by either replacing it immediately with another one or by using
an air management module. If you do not have a replacement module or an air
management module, do not remove the drive module; that is, it is not harmful to
the storage system to keep a faulty drive inserted until you have a replacement
drive. If you do have an air management module, it is installed using the same
procedure for removing a drive module as described below.
Caution - If you remove a drive module and do not replace it within two minutes,
you alter the air flow inside the enclosure, which could cause overheating of the
enclosure. Do not remove a drive module unless you have a replacement drive
module or air management module to immediately replace the one you removed.
To remove a drive from an enclosure, perform the following steps:
1.Follow all static electricity precautions as described in “Static Electricity
Precautions” on page 84.
2.Press and slide the release latch button to the right to disengage the latch.
Figure 7-5 Releasing the Drive Module Lever
Release latch button
108 HP StorageWorks 2000 Family Modular Smart Array troubleshooting guideMarch 2008
3.Pull the latch out toward the left to disengage the drive module from the enclosure’s
internal connector.
Figure 7-6 Disengaging the Drive Module
4.Wait 20 seconds for the internal disks to stop spinning.
5.Pull the drive module out of the enclosure.
Installing a Drive Module
To install the a drive module, perform the following steps:
1.Follow all static electricity precautions as described in “Static Electricity
Precautions” on page 84.
2.Push the release button located on the right edge of the drive to the right to open the
locking mechanism. (see Figure 7-5).
3.Slide the drive module into the drive slot as far as it will go.
Pull the latch out toward the left
Chapter 7 Troubleshooting and Replacing FRUs 109
4.Rotate the release latch toward the right until the latch clicks closed to firmly seat
the drive module in the enclosure’s internal connector.
If the controller enclosure is powered on, the green Online/Activity LED
illuminates, indicating that the disk drive is functional.
5.Use the SMU status page (Manage > Vdisk Configuration > Disk Drive Status) to
check the status of the disk and then use Table7-6 to determine how to continue.
Tab le7 -6 Disk Drive Status
Status Action
The status of the virtual disk that originally had
the failed drive status is Good. A global or
virtual disk (dedicated) spare has been
successfully integrated into the virtual disk and
the replacement drive module can be assigned as
either a global spare or a virtual disk spare.
Use SMU to assign the new drive module as either
a global spare or a vdisk spare:
Select Manage > Virtual Disk Config > Global
Spare Menu.
The status of the disk drive just installed is
LEFTOVER.
All of the member disk drives in a virtual disk
contain metadata in the first sectors. The storage
system uses the metadata to identify virtual disk
members after restarting or replacing enclosures.
Use SMU to clear the metadata if you have a disk
drive that was previously a member of a virtual
disk. After you clear the metadata, you can use the
disk drive in a virtual disk or as a spare:
Select Manage > Utilities > Disk Drive Utilities >
Clear Metadata.
Select the disk, and click on Clear Metadata for
Selected Disk Drives.
If the status of the virtual disk that originally had
the failed drive status is FATAL FAIL, two or
more drive modules have failed.
All data in the virtual disk is lost. Use the SMU
Trust Virtual Disk function to attempt to bring the
virtual disk back online.
Select Manage > Utilities > Recovery Utilities >
Trust Vdisk.
Note: You must be a Diagnostic Manage user to
access the Trust Vdisk submenu. See the reference
guide for more information on access privileges.
110 HP StorageWorks 2000 Family Modular Smart Array troubleshooting guideMarch 2008
6.After replacing a failed drive, save the configuration settings as described in
“Saving Configuration Settings” on page 86.
The saved configuration includes configuration information for all the drive
modules in the virtual disk. When you save the configuration settings to a file, you
also save the configuration of the virtual disk onto each of the hard drives. This step
saves the current configuration onto the new hard drive. If the drive is used as a
spare, its metadata is automatically updatd.
The status of the virtual disk that originally had
the failed drive status is DRV ABSENT or
INCOMPLETE. These status indicators only
occur when the enclosure is initially powered up.
DRV ABSENT indicates that one drive module
is bad. INCOMPLETE indicates that two or
more drive modules are bad.
See “Verify That the Correct Power-On Sequence
Was Performed” on page111. If the power-on
sequence was correct, locate and replace the
additional failed drive modules.
The status of the virtual disk that originally had
the failed drive indicates that the virtual disk is
being rebuilt.
Wait for the virtual disk to complete its operation.
The status of the virtual disk that originally had
the failed drive is DRV FAILED.
If this status occurs after you replace a defective
drive module with a known good drive module, the
enclosure midplane might have experienced a
failure.
Replace the enclosure.
Tab le7 -6 Disk Drive Status (Continued)
Status Action
Chapter 7 Troubleshooting and Replacing FRUs 111
Verify That the Correct Power-On Sequence Was
Performed
Review the power-on sequence that you most recently used for the enclosure. If you
are uncertain about the sequence used, repeat the power-on sequence in the
following order to see if it results in a Good status for the virtual disk that originally
had the failed drive.
1.Power up the enclosures and associated data host in the following order:
a.Drive enclosure first
b. Controller enclosure next
c. Data hosts last (if they had been powered down for maintenance purposes)
2.In SMU, select Monitor > Status > Vdisk Status to display the virtual disk overview
panel.
This panel displays an icon for each virtual disk with information about the virtual
disk below it.
Installing an Air Management Module
An air management module looks like a drive module; however, it is an empty box
used to maintain optimum airflow and proper cooling in an enclosure. If your
system was ordered with less than 12 drive modules it was shipped with air
management modules for the slots without drive modules. Optionally, air
management modules can be ordered.
If you must remove a drive module and cannot immediately replace it, you must
leave the faulty drive module in place, or insert an air management module to
maintain the optimum airflow inside the chassis. The blank is installed using the
same procedure as “Installing a Drive Module” on page 108.
112 HP StorageWorks 2000 Family Modular Smart Array troubleshooting guideMarch 2008
Identifying Virtual Disk Faults
Obvious virtual disk problems involve the failure of a member disk drive. However,
there are a number of not so obvious issues that result in virtual disk faults as seen
in Table7-7.
Tab le7 -7 Virtual Disk Faults
Problem Solution
Expanding virtual disk requires
days to complete.
In general, expanding a virtual disk can take days to complete.
You cannot stop the expansion once it is started.
If you have an immediate need, create a new virtual disk of the
size you want, transfer your data to the new virtual disk, and
delete the old virtual disk.
Failover causes a virtual disk to
become critical when one of its
drives “disappears.”
In general, controller failover is not supported if a disk drive is
in a drive enclosure that is connected with only one cable to the
controller enclosure. This is because access to the drive
enclosure will be lost if the controller to which it is connected
fails. When the controller with the direct connection to the drive
enclosure comes back online, access to the drive enclosure
drives is restored. To avoid this problem, ensure that two cables
are used to connect the enclosures as shown in the user guide,
and that the cables are connected securely and are not damaged.
If the problem persists or affects a disk drive in a controller
enclosure, a hardware problem might have occurred in the drive
module, midplane, or controller module. Identify and replace the
FRU where the problem occurred
A virtual disk is much smaller
than it should be.
Verify that the disk drives are all the same size within the virtual
disk. The virtual disk is limited by the smallest sized disk.
Volumes in the virtual disk are
not visible to the host.
Verify that the volumes are mapped to the host using SMU:
Manage > Volume Management > Volume Mapping > Map by
Volume.
Virtual Disk Degraded
Event codes 58 and 1, or event
codes 8 and 1
Replace the failed disk drive and add the replaced drive as a
spare to the critical virtual disk.
If you have dynamic spares enabled, you only need to replace
the drive. The system will automatically reconstruct the virtual
disk.
Chapter 7 Troubleshooting and Replacing FRUs 113
Clearing Metadata From a Disk Drive
All of the member disk drives in a virtual disk contain metadata in the first sectors.
The storage system uses the metadata to identify virtual disk members after
restarting or replacing enclosures.
Clear the metadata if you have a disk drive that was previously a member of a
virtual disk. Disk drives in this state display “Leftover” in the Display All Devices
page and in the Clear Metadata page. After you clear the metadata, you can use the
disk drive in a virtual disk or as a spare.
To clear metadata from a disk drive, see “Clearing Metadata From Leftover Disk
Drives” on page 51.
Virtual Disk Failure
Event codes 58 and 3, or event
codes 8 and 3
Replace the bad disk drive and restore the data from backup.
Virtual Disk Quarantined
Event code 172
Ensure that all drives are turned on.
When the vdisk is de-quarantined, event code 79 is returned.
Spare Disk Failure
Event code 62
Replace the disk.
If this disk was a dedicated spare for a vdisk, assign another
spare to the vdisk.
Spare Disk Unusable
Event code 78
The disk might not have a great enough capacity for the vdisk.
Replace the spare with a disk that has a capacity equal to or
greater than the smallest disk in the vdisk.
Mixed drive type errors Virtual disks do not support mixed drive types.
Verify that the drives in the virtual disk are of the same type
(SATA or SAS) and that they have the same capacity. If you
attempt to build a virtual disk with mixed drive types you will
receive an error.
If you attempt to build a virtual disk with various sized disk
drives, a warning will be displayed. The capacity of the smallest
disk will be set for all others.
Tab le7 -7 Virtual Disk Faults (Continued)
Problem Solution
114 HP StorageWorks 2000 Family Modular Smart Array troubleshooting guideMarch 2008
Identifying Power-and-Cooling Module Faults
When isolating faults in the power-and-cooling module, it is important to remember
that the module consists of two primary components: fans and a power supply.
When ether of these components fails, SMU provides notification, the faults are
recorded in the event log, and the power-and-cooling module’s status LED changes
from green to amber. Alternatively, you can use the CLI to poll for events; see the
CLI reference guide.
Note - When a power supply fails, the fans of the module continue to operate
because they draw power from the power bus located on the midplane.
Once a fault is identified in the power-and-cooling module, you need to replace the
entire module.
Caution - Because removing the power-and-cooling module significantly disrupts
the enclosure’s airflow, do not remove the power-and-cooling module until you have
the replacement module.
Table7-8 lists possible power-and-cooling module faults.
Tab le7 -8 Power-and-Cooling Module Faults
Fault Solution
Power supply fan warning or failure, or
power supply warning or failure. Event code 168
Check that all of the fans are working using
SMU.
Make sure that no slots are left open for
more than 2 minutes. If you need to replace
a module, leave the old module in place
until you have the replacement, or use a
blank cover to close the slot. Leaving a slot
open negatively affects the airflow and
might cause the unit to overheat.
Make sure that the controller modules are
properly seated in their slots and that their
latches are locked.
Chapter 7 Troubleshooting and Replacing FRUs 115
Removing and Replacing a Power-and-Cooling
Module
A single power-and-cooling module is sufficient to maintain operation of the
enclosure. It is not necessary to halt operations and completely power off the
enclosure when replacing only one power-and-cooling module.
Caution - When you remove a power-and-cooling module, install the new module
within two minutes of removing the old module. The enclosure might overheat if
you take more than two minutes to replace the power-and-cooling module.
Removing a Power-and-Cooling Module
To remove a power-and-cooling module from an enclosure, perform the following
steps:
1.Follow all static electricity precautions as described in “Static Electricity
Precautions” on page 84.
2.Set the power switch on the module to the Off position.
3.Disconnect the power cable.
Power-and-cooling module status is listed as failed
or you receive a voltage event notification. Event
code 168
Check that the switch on each power-and-
cooling module is turned on.
Check that the power cables are firmly
plugged into both power-and-cooling
modules and into an appropriate electrical
outlet.
Replace the power-and-cooling module.
AC Power LED is off. Same as above.
DC Voltage & Fan Fault/Service LED is on. Replace the power-and-cooling module.
Tab le7 -8 Power-and-Cooling Module Faults (Continued)
Fault Solution
116 HP StorageWorks 2000 Family Modular Smart Array troubleshooting guideMarch 2008
4.Turn the thumbscrew at the top of the latch (see Figure 7-7) counterclockwise until
the thumbscrew is disengaged from the power-and-cooling module.
Do not remove the thumbscrew from the latch.
Figure 7-7 Removing the Power Supply from the Chassis
5.As shown in Figure 7-7, rotate the latch downward to about 45 degrees, supplying
leverage to disconnect the power-and-cooling module from the internal connector.
6.Use the latch to pull the power-and-cooling module out of the chassis.
Note - Do not lift the power-and-cooling module by the latch. This could break the
latch. Hold the power-and-cooling module by the metal casing.
Thumbscrew
Latch
Chapter 7 Troubleshooting and Replacing FRUs 117
Installing a Power-and-Cooling Module
To install a power-and-cooling module, perform the following steps:
1.Orient the new power-and-cooling module with the AC connector and power switch
toward the right as shown in Figure 7-7, and slide the module into the power supply
slot as far as it will go.
2.Rotate the latch upward so that is flush against the power-and-cooling module to
ensure that the connector on the module engages the connector inside the chassis.
3.Turn the thumbscrew at the top of the power supply latch clockwise until it is
finger-tight to secure the latch to the power-and-cooling module.
4.Reconnect the power cable.
5.Set the power switch to the On position.
Replacing an Enclosure
The enclosure consists of an enclosure’s metal housing and the midplane that
connects controller/expansion modules, drive modules, and power-and-cooling
modules. This FRU replaces an enclosure that has been damaged or whose midplane
has been damaged. Often times a damaged midplane will appear as though a
controller module has failed. If you replace a controller module and it does not
remedy the original fault, replace the enclosure.
To make a fully functional enclosure, you must insert the following parts from the
replaced enclosure:
Drive modules and air management modules
Two power-and-cooling modules
One or two controller modules (for a controller enclosure)
One or two expansion modules (for a drive enclosure)
To install the individual modules, use the replacement instructions provided in this
guide. To configure the enclosure, see the user guide. The IP address for the
controllers is maintained on the midplane. When you replace the enclosure, you
need to reset the IP address as described in the user guide.
Caution - If connected data hosts are not inactive during this replacement
procedure, data loss could occur.
118 HP StorageWorks 2000 Family Modular Smart Array troubleshooting guideMarch 2008
119
APPENDIXA
Troubleshooting Using the CLI
This appendix briefly describes CLI commands that are useful for troubleshooting
storage system problems. For detailed information about command syntax and using
the CLI, see the CLI reference guide.
Topics covered in this appendix include:
“Viewing Command Help” on page 120
“clear cache” on page 120
“clear expander-status” on page 120
“ping” on page121
“rescan” on page 121
“reset host-channel-link” on page 121
“restart” on page 121
“restore defaults” on page 122
“set debug-log-parameters” on page 122
“set expander-fault-isolation” on page 123
“set expander-phy” on page 123
“set led” on page 123
“set protocols” on page 123
“show debug-log” on page 124
“show debug-log-parameters” on page 124
“show enclosure-status” on page 124
“show events” on page 125
“show expander-status” on page 125
“show frus” on page 125
“show protocols” on page 125
“show redundancy-mode” on page 126
“trust” on page 126
120 HP StorageWorks 2000 Family Modular Smart Array troubleshooting guideMarch 2008
Viewing Command Help
To view brief descriptions of all commands that are available to the user level you
logged in as, type:
To view help for a specific command, type either:
To view information about the syntax to use for specifying disk drives, virtual disks,
volumes, and volume mapping, type:
clear cache
Clears any unwritable cache in both RAID controllers for a specified volume, or any
orphaned data for volumes that no longer exist. This command can be used with a
dual-controller configuration only.
For details about using clear cache, see the CLI reference guide.
clear expander-status
Note - This command should only be used by service technicians, or with the
advice of a service technician.
Clears the counters and status for SAS Expander Controller lanes. Counters and
status can be reset to a good state for all enclosures, or for a specific enclosure
whose status is ERROR as shown by the show expander-status command.
For details about using clear expander-status, see the CLI reference guide.
# help
# help command
# command ?
# help syntax
Appendix A Troubleshooting Using the CLI 121
ping
Tests communication with a remote host. The remote host is specified by IP address.
Ping sends ICMP echo response packets and waits for replies.
For details about using ping, see the CLI reference guide
rescan
When installing a system with drive enclosures attached, the enclosure IDs might
not agree with the physical cabling order. This is because the controller might have
been previously attached to some of the same enclosures and it attempts to preserve
the previous enclosure IDs if possible. To correct this condition, make sure that both
controllers are up and perform a rescan using the CLI.
For details about using rescan, see the CLI reference guide
reset host-channel-link
Issues a loop initialization primitive (LIP) from specified controllers on specified
channels. This command is for use with an FC system using FC-AL (loop) topology.
For details about using reset host-channel-link, see the CLI reference
guide.
restart
Restarts the RAID controller or the Management Controller in either or both
controller modules.
If you restart a RAID controller, it attempts to shut down with a proper failover
sequence, which includes stopping all I/O operations and flushing the write cache to
disk, and then the controller restarts. The Management Controllers are not restarted
so they can provide status information to external interfaces.
If you restart a Management Controller, communication with it is temporarily lost
until it successfully restarts. If the restart fails, the partner Management Controller
remains active with full ownership of operations and configuration information.
122 HP StorageWorks 2000 Family Modular Smart Array troubleshooting guideMarch 2008
Caution - If you restart both controller modules, you and users lose access to the
system and its data until the restart is complete.
Note - If the storage system is connected to a Microsoft Windows host, the
following event is recorded in the Windows event log: Initiator failed to connect to
the target.
For details about using restart, see the CLI reference guide.
restore defaults
Note - This command should only be used by service technicians, or with the
advice of a service technician.
Restores the manufacturer's default configuration to the controllers. When the
command informs you that the configuration has been restored, you must restart the
RAID controllers and Management Controllers for the changes to take effect. After
restarting the controllers, hosts might not be able to access volumes until you re-
map them.
Caution - This command changes how the system operates and might require some
reconfiguration to restore host access to volumes.
For details about using restore defaults, see the CLI reference guide.
set debug-log-parameters
Note - This command should only be used by service technicians, or with the
advice of a service technician.